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Britain had been expecting air raids long before Adolf Hitler ordered his Luftwaffe to bomb the city of Londonon the 7th September 1940 and had taken many precautions to protect themselves from the bombs.

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Introduction

Describe the effects on everyday life in Britain Britain had been expecting air raids long before Adolf Hitler ordered his Luftwaffe to bomb the city of London on the 7th September 1940 and had taken many precautions to protect themselves from the bombs. The government had predicted that 100000 tonnes of bombs would fall on London in the first fortnight of the war. They expected thousands of civilians would be killed and injured. Many cardboard coffins were made and lime pits were dug for mass burial. It was presumed that the Germans would use gas, as they had done in the First World War; therefore gas masks were distributed to all of the population and were to be carried at all times. ...read more.

Middle

The amount of casualties caused by driving in the dark equalled the amount caused by the bombing. British civilians did not really experience the horror of the war on the front line until 7 September 1940. This date signalled the beginning of the bombing campaign against London and other major cities which was known as the 'Blitz'. On the first night of bombing 430 people were killed. This night was called Black Saturday. The target for the first raids was the East End, with its docks and factories; this was also a densely populated area. As the Blitz went on the rest of London was hit, including Buckingham Palace and St. Paul's Cathedral .After November other major cities were bombed attacked, specifically aimed at destroying factories making war products, such as Coventry and Liverpool. ...read more.

Conclusion

The North-West and Manchester in particular was attacked in December 1940. Liverpool was attacked regularly and in May 1941 suffered the biggest single raid on a mainland city, involving 500 bombers. Fires burnt out of control because water mains were hit. The city lost some of its finest buildings. A freighter, the SS Malakand, carrying 1000 tons of explosives received a direct hit and the noise was heard over 30 km away. The docks around the ship were destroyed, as were the homes of people who lived and worked around the docks. Glasgow and the Clyde shipyard towns were hit hard in the spring of 1941. Belfast was devastated in April 1941 because there were no anti-aircraft guns as it had been thought that the Germans would never fly so far. At lest 1000 people were killed and 150,000 made homeless, shipbuilding took six months to recover. ...read more.

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