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By Close Reference to The Lumber Room and The Destructors examine the behaviour of Nicholas and Trevor and stay how far you feel that actions are understandable and justified

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Introduction

By Close Reference to The Lumber Room and The Destructors examine the behaviour of Nicholas and Trevor and stay how far you feel that actions are understandable and justified The two boys, Trevor and Nicholas have a very different behaviour but they have the same reason to perform their actions on their enemies. This reason is revenge. Although, the action they take to gain revenge are very different. Trevor carries out his revenge on society by destroying Mr Thomas's or Old Misery's house whereas Nicholas takes his vengeance on his sio-distant aunt by spoiling her image as an adult. Trevor plans to destroy the house when Mr Thomas will be away all tomorrow and Bank Holiday, and after he becomes the leader of the Wormsley Common Gang. This gives him more confidence and power to plan the tactics, and more respect from the gang. Trevor does this by going to see the interior design and structure of the house. ...read more.

Middle

Nicholas goes into the lumber room to trick her into thinking that he has entered the gooseberry garden when he is not suppose to. As the aunt remarked to herself; "Only because I have told him he is not to," proves this. She tries to catch him into doing something wrong by entering the garden but slips into the rain-water tank. Nicholas then hears her calling him and reaches the front of the garden. He informs her that he is not allowed to enter the garden and accuses her of being the Evil One as she lied to him. As Nicholas shouts to his aunt; "Now I know that you are the Evil One and not aunt," illustrates this. Nicholas finally punishes his aunt by not rescuing her out of the tank. His behaviour is excessive and unnatural as a young child. Trevor's action is understandable because the house was constructed and designed by Christopher Wren and not by his father, it contained panellings and stairs, its survived in the Blitz, and its state was still looking beautiful. ...read more.

Conclusion

Trevor's action is not justified because he is taking his revenge on the wrong sector of society. This is futile as it does not affect the people who made Trevor's family descend down in society but Mr Thomas, an innocent and old person who lived in the beautiful house all alone, and did not cause any of this to them. I also feel that Trevor does not have the right to destroy the house because it is not his property but Mr Thomas's. Nevertheless, Nicholas's action is justified because he was debarred to go to Jagborough sands with the other children by his soi-distant aunt, and so had to stay at home as a form of punishment from her. Therefore, my opinion on this is beneficial because Nicholas feels that his aunt should not have punished him in trying to prove the characteristics of the adults. I also approve of his action because I feel that adults should admit their mistakes, listen to what children say, and not disregard their views. Grade: C+ ...read more.

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