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Catcher In The Rye - review.

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Introduction

Mark Barton 12TT 8TH September 2003 Catcher In The Rye When the Catcher In The Rye was first published it became steeped in an overwhelming amount of controversy and was consequently banned in America after it's first publication. John Lennon's assassin, Mark Chapman, asked the former Beatle to sign a copy of the book earlier in the morning of the day that he murdered Lennon. Police found the book in his possession upon apprehending the psychologically disturbed Chapman. However, the book itself contains nothing that could be associated with leading Chapman to act as he did, it could have been any book that he was reading the day he decided to kill John Lennon, and as a result of the fact that it was The Catcher in the Rye, a book describing a nervous breakdown, the media picked up on the "connection". This gave the book even more intrigue, as in the world we live in, any bad news is good news, and unfortunately The Catcher In The Rye was associated with this bad news, and was unfortunately banned, but re-released seven years after the incident in 1958. ...read more.

Middle

Salinger gains this effect by using very chatty informal language, that is in relation to the teenage use of slang and euphemism of fifties America. Through Salinger's use of informality, and the use of a situation of flunking school, which many teenagers have to experience in their life, we are able to reflect with Holden's tragic breakdown and the reasons for it. Through Salinger's use of making Holden seem like a friend, and a normal boy, my age, the events that take place in his 'vacation' in New York really do help us understand Holden's feelings, which he is not aware of. Salinger also picks up on points in the book that we can't help but to think about. When Holden begins to investigate his own sense of emptiness, before finally concluding that his feelings are normal for all teenagers his age and that the world is full of 'phonies' with each one out for their own 'phonie' gain, is Holden actually the one who is going insane, or is it society who are insane? ...read more.

Conclusion

By the conclusion of the story Holden finds himself completely broken down both physically and emotionally, comforted only by the sight of his sisters simple childish pleasures of a merry-go-round. Salinger ends the story with Holden's refusal to explain what had happened to him after he had returned home all Salinger says is "I got sick". Salinger uses know real detail of his sickness, although it is fairly blatant that Holden's mental state by the end of the book, may have lead him to a suicide attempt, Salinger only uses euphemisms such as "getting sick" to describe what has happened to him, but the implications are clear. The Catcher In The Rye is a novel, which I find very disturbing. I believe it is disturbing as the character of Holden Caulfield is very much like people I know who maybe have flunked school, and have started rebelling against society, as well as the character being someone who I would easily relate to. I would recommend this thought provoking novel as a fascinating and enlightening description of our human condition. However, beware... for that very reason it is not comfortable reading. ...read more.

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