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Character Analysis in A Midsummer Night's Dream

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Introduction

Character Analysis in A Midsummer Night's Dream The story of A Midsummer Night's Dream was that of love. Throughout the play, Shakespeare tried to show that love is unpredictable, unreasonable, and at times is blind. The primary focus in this play was love and its relation to marriage. Shakespeare carefully and skillfully used the presence of a wedding to add to the dramatic action of the play. After all, a wedding was the culmination of lover's vows and the commencement of their marriage. The theme of love was repeatedly used during the play and practically everything that was said and done was related to this concept of love. Shakespeare made all of the different characters intermingle and intertwine causing their lives to crisscross, circle, and even parallel each other's. This was an ingenious display of character manipulation. At first, everything was very confusing, and the characters were faced with many different problems. In the end, however, they were still able to persevere and win their true love. The four young lovers each developed in their own ways. Hermia, the daughter of Egeus, was in love with Lysander from the beginning. However, her father wanted her to marry Demetrius. Hermia was strong-willed and stubborn. She adamantly refused to be forced in to a marriage with Demetrius. ...read more.

Middle

In the beginning he started out madly in love with Hermia and unable to hide his true feelings for her. He was forced by the spell to forget about Hermia and instead he wanted her friend Helena. Lysander chased Helena and begged for her love. The spell from the pansy nectar caused Lysander to take a totally different view on his life. Now, he wanted Helena and he could not even stand to look at Hermia. When Hermia finally found them all in the woods, Lysander told her that he hated her. She was crushed and did not believe what was happening. Lysander showed no emotion and continued to try and court Helena. This was not the same Lysander that was in the beginning of the play. He used to serenade Hermia and read her poems. Now he could not even look at her. She did not know that Lysander was not acting on his own instincts; rather he was under a deep spell. Only when the spell was reversed was Lysander able to reconfirm his love for Hermia. Then Lysander became his old self again. Demetrius was tied in to this love circle from the start of the play. He was supposed to receive Hermia as his wife. ...read more.

Conclusion

She automatically thought that they were making fun of her. When Hermia entered in the midst of this, Helena's anger was heightened. Eventually all of the spells were correctly placed and Helena got her true love Demetrius. All four lovers returned to Athens, uncertain as to whether the night's events were real or only dream. This was comical because Helena, Hermia, Lysander, and Demetrius were all used like pawns in a chess game. The fairies played them all against each other and in the end they each were reunited with the lover of their choice. The play ended with both couples getting married at the wedding of Theseus and Hippolyta. It was ironic that the three weddings all took place at the same time. After they were married, the three couples waited for a night of entertainment before they went up to sleep. The play "Pyramus and Thisby was performed so poorly that all of the guests and the couples themselves were hysterical with laughter. This was a much-needed form of comic relief. It lightened the mood and ended the play on a happy note. A Midsummer Night's Dream focused on the common man and the common woman and the ecstasies of love. The final resolution to this story proved that no matter what happens, love conquers. Like Lysander said in the beginning, "The course of true love never did run smooth." ...read more.

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