• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Choose 3 poems by Wilfred Owen that look at different aspects of war. Compare how Owen deals with each aspect and consider what his overall message might be.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Choose 3 poems by Wilfred Owen that look at different aspects of war. Compare how Owen deals with each aspect and consider what his overall message might be. Wilfred Owen was born the 18th of March 1893 in Oswestry. He was the eldest of four children and was brought up in the Anglican religion. He studied at the Birkenhead Institute, at Shrewsbury Technical School and at the University of London. He enlisted for war in 1915 and later that year was sent to France. In 1917 he was diagnosed as being shell-shocked after being wounded three times and was sent to the Craig Lockhart War Hospital in Edinburgh. Here he met with the war poet Siegfried Sassoon. This meeting seems to have been exceedingly valuable to Owens career as a poet. Sassoon's pacifism reaffirmed Owen's views about the war and influenced his poetic style, encouraging him to write in a more colloquial and ironic style much like that of Sassoon's. Later, Owen was sent to Scarborough and had more time to write and work on his writing technique. His style developed using both assonance and half-rhyme which was greatly admired by his peers. In late 1918 Owen was sent back out to his former battalion and a month later was awarded the Military Cross for bravery. The war ended on the 11th November 1918 at 11 O'clock, just a week after Owen had been killed in one of the last and most futile battles of the First World War. ...read more.

Middle

The beginnings of both poems involve soldiers supposedly marching to their fate. The difference between the two however, is that in 'The Send-Off' they don't know what is happening as such, whereas in 'Dulce Et' they are fully aware. 'Dulce Et' is set right in the centre of the war and the opening images we have are of soldiers "coughing like hags", cursing "through sludge" and there is definitely not the same celebratory an uplifting scene that was set at the beginning of the send off. The image we get from the first few lines is obviously nothing like that of the lie that the British Expeditionary Force portrayed it would be like. The men are walking "like old beggars under sacks" giving us a clear image of exhausted soldiers and even when walking for rest they are unable to move quickly. Suddenly the mood of the poem changes at the phrase, "Gas! Gas! Quick, boys - An ecstasy of fumbling". This is our first example in 'Dulce Et' of Wilfred changing emotions abruptly and the layout of the line alerts us and just like war itself, the poem is unexpectedly changing throughout. The repetition of the short word, "Gas!" in two short stabs followed by, "Quick, boys - An ecstasy of fumbling" clearly shows us an image of the men fumbling around in an "ecstasy" and "Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time". ...read more.

Conclusion

"The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est, Pro patria mori." means it is sweet and honorable to die for one's country and is a rather ironic line as it opposes the message he has been portraying throughout the whole play. Much alike 'Dulce Et Decorum Est' and 'The Send-Off', 'Disabled' also finishes in a negative way. Throughout the whole play we have had the split image of this man, disabled as an outcome of war. The picture of a brave soldier being cheered off to war, and that of a crippled old man returning home receiving more a cheer of pity rather than respect. This is further explained in the phrase, 'Some cheered him home, but not as crowds cheer Goal.' The final line is a rhetorical question, 'And put him into bed? Why don't they come?' summing up the apathy that people felt towards the man and showing that he had been forgotten. All 3 poems are different, however extremely similar in particular ways. There is clearly a relationship between much of Owens work as he uses various effective similar techniques to influence our sympathy towards those who lived and died and our hate for the war that caused it. Whilst Owen wrote the majority of his poems on a personal basis, he has been arguably the most prominent war poet and has intrigued both poets and readers for years. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level War Poetry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

**** 4 STARS

This is an excellent essay which includes biographical detail which gives further insight into the contextual factors of the poems. Very good use of literary terminology and PEE is used throughout which enforces the perceptive and thoughtful comments. The writer clearly understands how the poet has crafted these poems and analyses the language and structure in detail.

Marked by teacher Katie Dixon 30/07/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level War Poetry essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    A Critical Analysis of ‘Strange Meeting’ by Wilfred Owen

    3 star(s)

    Owen's main poetic device used in 'Strange Meeting' is that of manipulation, to avoid stating anything obviously, as well as to make the setting seem darker and more regretting. By doing this he further argues his point that war is evil because no matter how terrible of a place he

  2. Marked by a teacher

    A Comparison of "Who's for the Game" and "Dulce et Decorum est".

    3 star(s)

    This creates a big impact as the poem stops being just that and becomes a horrific real experience. Owen says "in all his dreams" as he had seen people die before as he was at war. However never had he witnessed or imagined a death so sickening.

  1. How does Wilfred Owen present the horror of war in 'Dulce et Decorum est'. ...

    He also uses harsh constantan sounds. This is reflecting the sounds of the firing of rifles and shells; they would be short sharp sounds. All these things give us a picture in our head of life in the trenches. This helps a lot to the horror of war as an image is more powerful then words.

  2. "'Lions led by donkeys.' How valid is this interpretation of the conduct of British ...

    Source C5 is a cartoon from an edition of comedy magazine Punch, published in February 1917. The cartoon gives a lighter and probably less accurate account of what would have actually have been said in a training to make the punch line in the joke, but the general idea that the Generals weren't directly involved in battle is still there.

  1. Disabled By Wilfred Owen

    "Poured", like his life is poured away. The powerful visual images created by Owen in the third stanza. Are contrasted by the glamorous images created in the fourth stanza. In the third stanza the man thought that going to war would be great. He thought he would look so brave and hard; impressing everyone especially his girlfriend;

  2. The diffusion of Ammonia Gas

    it did take longer to go upwards than it did o go downwards but for a different reason.

  1. WAR POETRY: Themes in War Poetry

    "Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam," as if to say England has always served you, it is worth to die for what make you who you are. The main feeling portrayed in the second stanza is that you, the solider, are English, thus representing the top nation and will be eternally blessed.

  2. Iain Crichton Smith's short story "The Telegram" - summary

    This causes suffering in the area because, "many of its young men had been killed" even though the community is far from the front line. The setting in place is also an important factor in the story. It is set in a small crofting community of perhaps twelve or so

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work