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Choose one scene or incident, which seems to you to be of crucial importance in the development of the play. Explain its importance and outline the dramatic consequences of decisions which are made or events which take place.

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Introduction

HAMLET ESSAY Jean Forrest Choose one scene or incident, which seems to you to be of crucial importance in the development of the play. Explain its importance and outline the dramatic consequences of decisions which are made or events which take place. Hamlet is a play which seems to me to have an incident of crucial importance which has dramatic consequences. This incident occurs in Act III, scene III, where the King Claudius is kneeling in thought, too guilty to pray to God. This provides Hamlet with the key opportunity to put an end to his procrastination and kill the King to seek revenge, yet Hamlet does not act. This inaction has many dramatic consequences, one of which eventually is Hamlet's own death. From the outset, Hamlet has been conveyed as a fairly sensitive young adult, he is very indecisive and for much of the play, struggles between his duty and his conscience. Hamlet is a thinker, and this may in fact, have proved to be his downfall. He finds spontaneity impossible and tortures himself with his thoughts from Act I scene V, where his father tells him of his uncle's actions and begs for revenge to be sought, until the final scene, where Hamlet finally takes action. ...read more.

Middle

During this time of thought (mostly during Act II) Hamlet becomes very depressed and moody, he also contemplates suicide on more than one occasion "To be or not to be" yet cannot tackle his conscious even for a decision over this. Hamlet then, becomes angered by the moving acting of a player, he finds fault in everything about himself and feels cowardly for not yet having taken any action. The only action to result from this is another plan which enables him to procrastinate even further. He decides that he cannot trust this ghost in case it is in fact an evil daemon and puts on a play to find the truth through his uncle's reaction. This plan works and leads to the incident which could have changed the play entirely. Hamlet feels he cannot kill his uncle at this time, there is dramatic irony in that the reader knows that Claudius is in fact not at prayer, as he feels he cannot talk to God, so Hamlet has really been provided with the perfect opportunity to seek revenge for his father. ...read more.

Conclusion

When Hamlet found out about Ophelia's death he was overwhelmed with grief and guilt which he then turned into anger and fought with Laertes in Ophelia's grave. The killing of Polonius also had a "knock on effect" with Laretes, he was already irate and vengeful because of his fathers murder, this was greatly heightened when he heard of his sister's death. With this wish for revenge on Hamlet, Laertes played straight into the hands of Claudius and became nothing more than his pawn. Laertes had a completely different nature from Hamlet in that he found no qualms in acting instantly when he hears of his fathers murder, he had one aim and that is revenge "To cut his throat i' the' church" this contrasts greatly with Hamlet as he wouldn't even kill Claudius when he suspected he was at prayer. The King hatched a plan to kill Hamlet, he couldn't do this publicly as he was very popular with the subjects of Denmark. The duel scene is very dramatic and becomes the climax of the play, and this situation would never have been reached the point where practically everyone dies if Hamlet had simply used his opportunity in Act III scene III, and hadn't hesitated. ...read more.

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