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Choose two short extracts to illustrate the way in which Keats uses vivid description and colour to describe the titans.

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Introduction

Isabelle Sherren 12H Choose two short extracts to illustrate the way in which Keats uses vivid description and colour to describe the titans. Pg. 34, lines 41 - 60 Pg. 28, lines 163 - 180 Throughout the poem, 'the fall of Hyperion,' we constantly see the recurrent theme of hope versus despair. The titans have fallen and lost their power to the Olympians and the poem progresses through their reactions, loss of hope and plans to regain power. In the first extract, pg.28, lines 163 - 180, we can see a particularly descriptive extract as the titans are listening in, 'sharp pain,' for Saturn's voice. The, 'mammoth-brood,' are all feeling isolated and ashamed of their recent defeat. However they all have hope in Hyperion, the God of the sun, he has not yet fallen so still has his, 'sov'reignty and rule, and majesty.' ...read more.

Middle

The light showing the life and energy that remains in Hyperion. 'Arches, and domes, and fiery galleries; and all its curtains of Aurorian clouds flush'd angerly.' The descriptive list of architectural magnificence makes it stand out more clearly. The second descriptive extract I am going to look at is on page 34 lines 41 - 60. This is at the beginning of book two, which starts off my looking at the disposed titans and the tortures they have been submitted to by the Olympians. The description of each of the disposed Titans, Creus, Tapetus, Cottus and Asia is extremely graphic and detailed and shows how each titan has reacted to the fall. 'Each one kept shroud, nor to his neighbour gave a word, or look, or action of despair.' ...read more.

Conclusion

Instead of wallowing in self-pity she is imagining the Titans comeback against the Olympians as, 'more thought than woe was in her dusky face.' 'And in her wide imagination stood Palm-shaded temples, and high rival fanes, By Oxus or in Ganges' sacred isles.' She is prophesying in the glory of her imagination and we start to see hope among the titans. These two extracts are both very descriptive with vivid and rich language and Keats uses them to describe the titans. The difference between the contrast of dark and light between the first and second is noticeable. In the first extract we see the titans hope for Hyperion, the God of the Sun so we have images of light and fire. However by the second extract they seem to have lost hope and be in despair, Keats also uses pathetic fallacy which he does by the use of the weather which is wet, dark and dismal. ...read more.

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