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Coleridge contrasts the two worlds of Kubla Khan by first describing the ordered world of Kubla Khans palace and suddenly changes rhythm and rhyme of the poem, which brings across the surrounding natural world that provides Kubla Khan the foundation of

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Introduction

Essay on the two worlds of Kubla Khan Coleridge contrasts the two worlds of Kubla Khan by first describing the ordered world of Kubla Khan's palace and suddenly changes rhythm and rhyme of the poem, which brings across the surrounding natural world that provides Kubla Khan the foundation of his power. However he is unable to control it. At the beginning of the poem Coleridge starts to build a sense of the exotic and mysterious. In the second line, Kubla Khan's power is emphasized as he orders a fitting palace for himself. Contrast is shown through the words 'stately' and 'pleasure dome'. 'Stately is suppose to convey Kubla Khan's grand and splendid creation while 'pleasure dome' refers to a place of leisure and luxury. ...read more.

Middle

In contrast to the structured dome and its gardens, the landscape surrounding Kubla's domain is wild and untamed, covered by ancient forests and cut by a majestic river. There is a difference between Kubla Khan's planned estate and nature's realm however they are seen to exist harmoniously together. The mood of the second stanza is of upheaval and turmoil. It refers to the anger, excitement and turbulence of Kubla's chosen place. The poem shifts from the balance and tranquility in the first few lines to an uneasy suggestion of what is beyond normal. There are contradictions in the river's path. Along with the boulders, the river emerges. The previous similes describing the boulders both use images involving striking: hail hits the earth; the thresher hits the grain. ...read more.

Conclusion

The damsel plays the instrument so beautifully that all passions are brought forth from the scenes before. The caverns appear in the poem for just a moment at first, as the place the river passes through. They are the opposite of the warm, happy palace. They are dramatic, freezing, underground, and represent everything the pleasure dome is not. In the line 'That sunny dome! those caves of ice!' The caverns are contrasted with the sunny dome, the caves of ice becomes a symbol of the forces of nature that lie under and surround the works of man. The clash of these forces is one of the main points of Coleridge's vision. In conclusion, Coleridge uses a pattern of contrast between worlds throughout the romantic poem, in order to give it both a purpose and structure that represents Coleridge's ideal of a harmonious blend of meaning and form in poetic art. ...read more.

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