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Coleridge's "Frost at midnight" is Coleridge's chance to reflect on his past while focusing on his current surroundings. In that, he realizes the beauty that he was deprived from living in the city

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Introduction

Splendors of silence In the poem, "Frost at Midnight," Samuel Coleridge uses his creative imagery and fascination with nature to create a beautiful picture. Focusing on the "frost," Coleridge personifies this natural occurrence as it "performs its secret ministry" as though it were a mysterious man lurking in the night. Much like other Romantic writers, Coleridge focuses on the natural elements in his surroundings to reflect upon his past. And thus realizes that he can make changes for his future. Nature as Coleridge recalls nature, "Tis calm indeed!" Coleridge explains, "so calm, that it disturbs/ And vexes meditation with its strange/ And extreme silentness. The only disturbance in this "silent Ministry" is the "owlets cry." ...read more.

Middle

Particularly, how Nature effects the imagination. He communicates how many more freedoms there are out in a natural setting and how one can remain free-spirited, as opposed to one who resides in the city. Coleridge is inspired by nature; he conveys that it teaches one to "ask" questions. He thus Comes to his own conclusion, that his child will "wander like a breeze" in a natural setting and "[he] shalt learn far other lore, /And in far other scenes" which is very contrary to his own childhood in the city. Coleridge says, "I was reared/In the great city, pent 'mid cloisters dim." He feels that the city deprived him of the liberation and beauty that nature provides. ...read more.

Conclusion

Because in nature, unlike the city, will not be filled false promises; every winter, there will always be frost and every summer, there will always be green grass. The City life as Coleridge says, was deprived of what he felt is beautiful, the view of the stars were "dim" and he did not have the freedom to "wander like a breeze" and take in the beauty of the "lakes and sandy shores." These are only some of the opportunities that natures provide and Coleridge makes it clear that he wants to give this chance to child. Coleridge's "Frost at midnight" is Coleridge's chance to reflect on his past while focusing on his current surroundings. In that, he realizes the beauty that he was deprived from living in the city and thus wants to provide his child with the many splendors that nature provides. ...read more.

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