• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Compare and contrast knowing a friend to knowing how to swim, knowing a scientific theory and knowing a historical period.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Theory of Knowledge Paper Jeremy Sutton TOK 9/4/06 Compare and contrast knowing a friend to knowing how to swim, knowing a scientific theory and knowing a historical period. What conclusions about the nature of knowledge can you reach? In every language, words are used as a means of communication. Many of these words have meanings that are ambiguous, sometimes having more than one meaning. Words referring to the human mind, such as love, memory, and especially knowledge, are the most associated with ambiguity. Knowledge is usually associated with different types of knowing. Though the difference is not present in the English language, romance languages, such as French and German, have more than one word that mean "to know." I myself take French, and I know that there are two different words that mean "to know:" "savoir," which refers to knowing a fact or piece of knowledge, and "conna�tre," which refers to knowing how to do something, or to be acquainted with. It still is hard for me to use those two different words in the right contexts, since as an American I am not used to distinguishing between the different uses of the verb "to know." ...read more.

Middle

Knowledge also requires the ability to adapt and reform prior knowledge. Picturing a pencil, one may imagine a yellow, cylindrical stick-like figure with a pink eraser on top. However, there are also pencils of different colors, shapes, and even mechanical pencils. All follow different patterns and mechanics, but all are pencils none the less. One must adapt that information into their prior knowledge of how a pencil might look. A child may see a brown horse in a children's book, and a black horse in another, and will identify both as horses, yet they are of different color and size. Adaptation of knowledge is including in all sorts of knowledge. At first, one learns how to swim not by mastering the technique and form to swim the fastest, but by focusing on how to stay afloat, to avoid drowning. Later on, one's knowledge of swimming adapts, learning new techniques and abilities that allow for faster and nimbler swimming. Although there are different types of knowledge, all types derive from a single state: attachments to a previous knowledge. Almost everything we "know," we learn from previous knowledge and experience, not necessarily or usually from ourselves. ...read more.

Conclusion

If a person gets amnesia, they lose their memory, possibly forgetting facts, but will not forget how to walk or run, or how to eat and drink. These are implicit skills, and it is very hard for one to lose both their implicit and explicit knowledge. From a collection of my previous theories of knowledge, I have come to several conclusions. There are many differences and levels of knowledge, and the English language does not distinguish the differences. Some languages, like French, have separate words that aim to differentiate the types of knowledge. However, there are many more differences in knowledge that even the romance languages do not distinguish. Differences in how knowledge is learned and how it is used are primarily the aspects that are ignored by words. Finally, even though there is a difference between knowledge that you can state (scientific theories and historical facts) and knowledge that you can use (how to swim), an understanding is required of both. Knowledge is used differently, but in the same way, however confusing that might be. You use some knowledge, and state other knowledge, but both are learned or adapted from previous knowledge, and are used to enhance the mind and expand its capacity. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Language: Context, Genre & Frameworks section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work