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Compare Katherina and Jane Eyre's attitude towards marriage, commenting on the historical context of each character and the language they use. What are your views on marriage and its future in the twenty-first century?

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Introduction

Compare Katherina and Jane Eyre's attitude towards marriage, commenting on the historical context of each character and the language they use. What are your views on marriage and its future in the twenty-first century? ...The two characters Katherina and Jane Eyre both have different views about marriage but they both believe that it is necessary. In the end Katherina believes that men are superior to women, where as Jane believes that woman are equal to men. Today society doesn't make women feel that they have to be married to gain importance they are treated as equals and it is not socially wrong for people not to be married. ...Katherina had no say of who she married, anyone could have her for the right price. When married her possessions then belonged to her husband. When this was written all women were expected to be loyal to there husbands, because if they were not they could be beaten and thrown out by their husband. ...read more.

Middle

Women in her eyes are in debt to their husbands "women oweth to their husband". In her eyes women are not equal to men "the subject owes the prince". To her women are peasants and a husband is "thy lord". ...Katherina uses lots of imagery "our lances are but straws" meaning that there arguments and actions seemed strong and appeared to be the right thing to do but really they were not. Her use of words makes the husband sound like royalty "thy husband is thy head, thy sovereign". ...Jane Eyre could choose whom she wanted to marry and the husband didn't get any money out of it. Women at this time still had few rights, they could have a carer and Jane was a governess, but there were very few jobs that women were allowed to do. A woman had little status if she was not married or if she was a mistress to a married man. ...read more.

Conclusion

There are only small amounts of imagery used "I would cross oceans" and "toil under eastern suns". ...Today marriage is not necessary and it should be your own decision to do it no one else's. Today marriage is not about gaining status or getting money its about love. People know that every person is equal and as long as its love it doesn't matter whether you get married or not. Its up to each and every individual person whether they get married or not. ...I wouldn't get married in a church because I don't think that you have to show a room full of people or God how much you care. It should be between the two people getting married. If two people get married in a registry office or don't get married and just live together it doesn't matter because it's there own choice and they both know how they feel. The act of being together even if it is just them living together should be enough as it proves how they feel about each other. ...read more.

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