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Compare Romeo's Love For Roseline And Then For Juliet In The Opening

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Introduction

Compare Romeo's Love For Roseline And Then For Juliet In The Opening Scenes Of The Play In the opening scenes of the play Romeo is presented to the audience as a courtly lover. When we first see Romeo he is walking lonely in the woods on foreign land, expressing his love for Roseline, he is very depressed and lonely. Benvolio tells the audience of the mental state if Romeo and how he has suddenly turned very anti-social. In the opening scene of the play Romeo uses oxymorons a lot, which he uses to express his feelings, he also feels very sorry for himself. In the opening scene of the play he talks about love and how it is destroying him rather than making his life better and more worthwhile. In the opening scenes of the play when Romeo is in love with Roseline he feels depressed and sad "sad hours seem long"; he is also very anti-social and will not mix with his friends at all. When there is a fight between the Montague's and the Capulet's, Romeo doesn't turn up to have a fight "O where is Romeo?". ...read more.

Middle

In the opening scene when Romeo is in love with Roseline all the language he uses about love is very negative, artificial and doesn't make complete sense. "Love is smoke". To do this Shakespeare uses oxymorons, this is because they don't make complete sense and they contradict themselves, and mean the opposite. His speech is very slow and pathetic; noting rhymes or makes complete sense. None of his language seems to have anything to do with love and never rhymes with love, as it should if he was truly in love. His language is very poetic and has a lot of O's in his speech which gives the impression that he feels sorry for himself. The Elizabethans symbol for unrequited passion was a rose, and in this play Shakespeare uses this symbol to express Romeos love for Rosaline, because even though a rose looks and sounds nice if you get to close to if it will hurt you with its thorns and maybe even draw blood. This is similar to Romeos love for Rosaline because although the idea of love looks good to Romeo when he gets closer to being in love with Rosaline it hurts him and destroys his life. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is a huge change in his appearance since he first entered the stage. He is no longer viewed as a courtly lover, but as a man involved with true love. The language he now uses to express himself changes dramatically; he no longer uses oxymorons. Instead of using these contradicting terms he immediately uses a sonnet, which is a fourteen line Shakespearean love poem. The poem is usually said between two lovers and it is can be as a conversation. In the sonnet that Shakespeare has in his play, Romeo and Juliet have just met. A typical Elizabethan audience would recognise this sonnet to mean that these two actors were in love. He does this by the words that he chooses to rhyme with. One example of this is, when Juliet chooses to rhyme with the word "kiss". This tells the audience that these two actors are in love. In the opening scene of the play when Romeo falls in love with Juliet, he doesn't talk about his obsession with the idea of being in love like when he was in love with Rosaline, in this scene he actually talks about Juliet and of features on her body. The typical Elizabethan audience would immediately get the impression that the love her was feeling for Juiliet was true love unlike the love that Romeo felt for Rosaline. ...read more.

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