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Compare the ability of at least two playwrights to turn one or more of the following to dramatic use in their world: irony; mystery and suspense; menace; comedy.

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Introduction

Compare the ability of at least two playwrights to turn one or more of the following to dramatic use in their world: irony; mystery and suspense; menace; comedy. ESSAY C In both A Streetcar Named Desire and Hamlet, Tennessee Williams and William Shakespeare, respectively, demonstrate their abilities to create engaging plays which work on several levels in order to produce the desired effect. One of the most important characteristics of these plays is the playwrights' success in using their words to create the worlds surrounding their works. Both Shakespeare and Williams effectively use irony in the aforementioned plays, both in the plot and with specific symbolism, to create mildly existential environments where effective irony is a confirmation of fate and justice. Immediately apparent to the reader upon completion of these two works is the glaring appearance of irony in the plays' plots. ...read more.

Middle

For example, Shakespeare employs subtle ironies in Hamlet as he develops the characters of Hamlet and Gertrude throughout the play. Hamlet, for example, doubts the reliability of the ghost, remaining unsure of Claudius' villainy, ironically almost believing his uncle over the father he appears to mourn over. Hamlet's insanity is also ironical, as it begins as a ploy simply to remove Claudius' suspicions of his discovery, and ends with Hamlet bordering on actual insanity and Claudius' suspicions only being increased and confirmed. With Gertrude, Shakespeare creates an arguably undynamic character who simply follows Claudius' requests, until; of course, she decides to drink the poison. Williams uses subtle irony in his play, although he incorporates a more symbolic approach, using names and political allusions. It is ironic that the coarse, violent sexuality of the Kowalskis exists in "Elysian Fields," the Greek's equivalent to heaven, and the "Belle Reve," the beautiful dream, is a place replete with fornication and deterioration. ...read more.

Conclusion

Meanwhile, Hamlet's revenge, while partially successful, results simply in the destruction of his family's line of rule, and the succession of Fortinbras, whose father Hamlet Senior killed, and whose approach was discounted by Claudius and his kingdom throughout the play. A Streetcar Named Desire ends in a comparatively ironical fashion, as Blanche symbolically dies from her insanity just as her husband did physically. Even more ironic is Williams' subtle commentary on Blanche's fate as Blanche's passage on the streetcar "Desire" led to "Cemeteries" and she was ultimately not permitted to remain in "Elysian Fields." Just as she lost "Belle Reve," her beautiful dream was lost. It is this ironical poetic justice that gives the plays their power, and creates the existential, destiny driven worlds of the plays. Using a varied array of techniques employing irony, Williams and Shakespeare effectively develop and portray their plays. It is the irony in Hamlet and A Streetcar Named Desire that accentuate the play's plots and settings to make them appealing. ...read more.

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