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Compare unseen extracts from two guidebooks to London: Baedeckers London and its Environs 1900 and Time Out London published in 2007

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Introduction

Compare unseen extracts from two guidebooks to London: Baedeckers London and its Environs 1900 and Time Out London published in 2007 Both texts A and text B are extracts from guidebooks which use linguistic devices in similar ways to convey their information and both share the purpose to inform their separate target audiences. However, both texts also have contrasting features due to the different time periods in which they were made and use these features to express their content in different ways, again, relevant to their individual audiences. Text A seems to be aimed at travellers from outside of London, who are therefore likely to be unfamiliar with many urban processes, and are in need of guidance. ...read more.

Middle

to 6d. or 7d.' which prepares the reader of what to expect financially and the use of ancient currency also highlights the difference in terms of context of production and reception in those days, where '1/2 d', '6d' and '7d' would have made perfect sense as opposed to the present day. The advisory tone and factual nature of the text also consolidates the discourse being a guidebook. Text B is a modern text that appears to be aimed at a wider scope of travellers than text A as it appeals to travellers in general. Though still formal with mainly factual content, text B has some opinions integrated within the extract, such as 'frustratingly, they're often out of order'. ...read more.

Conclusion

On the other hand, it can be argued that in the past, such style of writing was due to the generalised prescriptive rules of grammar, and not writing in this way would be frowned upon by society. This is highly contrasting to modern times, where internet blogs are accepted as a regular occurrence and rules of grammar are unnecessary. Moreover, text A uses 'he' and 'his' 3rd person masculine pronouns to address the reader as opposed to 'you' which is recurrently used in text B. This again highlights a major difference in context of production, where in text A, the use of 'he' was common in society as the male gender was deemed superior as women's rights were significantly less regarded. Whereas, text A represents a modern era where 'you' remains impartial and indifferent to sexism, keeping the connection with the reader personal and objective, as well as promoting equality. ...read more.

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