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"Comparing Jessie Pope's Who's for the game and Wilfred Owens Dulce Est Decorum"

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Introduction

English homework: "Comparing Jessie Owens's Who's for the game and Wilfred Owens Dulce Est Decorum" In Jessie Pope's 'Who's for the Game?' the presentation of war is quite different to what you might expect. This poem is a recruiting poem with the aim of encouraging men to volunteer to join the forces. It was written at the beginning of the First World War and therefore the true disastrous effects of the war had not been experienced. Those left behind, women, children and exempt men, were often unaware of the true horror of the war and instead were seduced by a romantic ideal. She writes in a more conversational manner, which makes the poem more memorable and persuasive to readers. She compares the war to a 'game', implying that there is little danger on the battlefield. ...read more.

Middle

She makes the country more appealing and dependable upon their support when she gives it a female gender. This capitalises on the sexist attitude of the era where men were expected to take care of and protect their women. Pope has written this poem in four parts with a regular rhythm and rhyme scheme. This makes the poem more memorable. This is also a technique employed in children's poetry and as such makes light of her subject matter. Wilfred Owen is not totally against war, but, as it says at the end of the poem, the old lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori or It is sweet and fitting To die for your country He is very angry about this lie that is being told to young men and the citizens of England that are back at home, not fighting. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is also the only place in the poem where a descriptive word is repeated, as though Owen can't quite believe what is happening. Owens intention is to get people to think about the lie that was told to many people about the First World War; about what was said happened in the trenches and what actually did. Owen try's to get his anger and frustration about what happened across to people and I think that even today, it does work. The poem has an affect on me that must have been even worse fifty years ago. It makes me feel very sad that this sort of thing did happen, that people died in such a way as this, and angry that the soldiers didn't know what they were going towards, that the families didn't know how their men suffered or died. ...read more.

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