• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Comparing poems 'Dulce et Decorum Est' and 'The Charge of the Light Brigade'.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Amy Taylor 11.2 Comparing poems 'Dulce et Decorum Est' and 'The Charge of the Light Brigade' Both 'Dulce et Decorum Est� and 'The Charge of the Light Brigade� are poems about war and the death of soldiers, but they express two very different attitudes to war. Tennyson�s poem 'Light Brigade' shows that war is about being heroic and brave, even though six hundred soldiers were killed because of a simple error "Someone had blundered" but they were still heroic. Owen�s poem 'Dulce', on the other hand presents the horror of war and unexpected death near trenches and it also shows us how the line "Dulce et Decorum est Pro patria mori" (it is sweet and fitting to die for your country), is fiction. It is said that Tennyson wrote 'Light Brigade' after reading about the battle of Balaclava in 1854, he himself was a civilian so had not personally had experience or seen the battle that he describes. Unlike Owen who was a soldier at the time he wrote 'Dulce'. Tennyson's poem was written to raise the morale of people at home about the soldiers in the Crimean war, not to tell them the truth about the horrors of war. Compared to Tennyson who wrote his poem as a civilian, Owen wrote 'Dulce' while he was serving as an officer towards the end of the first world war. ...read more.

Middle

Owen based his poem around the single line "Dulce et Decorum Est Pro patria mori" (it is sweet and fitting to die for your country), he wanted to show that it is far from sweet and fitting but horrible and unjustified, from start to finish. "... you would not tell with such high zest To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old lie: Dulce et Decorum Est Pro patria mori" This final stanza sums up what Owen wanted to get across to the reader, that if you knew the truth as he did you wouldn't be so happy to tell children about the war just for a bit of glory for your country, it's not something suitable for children's ears. He gives this image of the awfulness of war from the very start in stanza one. He gives a different image of the soldiers from what you would expect, soldiers are thought of as respectable, smart and proud men but the picture Owen paints is unpleasant and ghastly. The soldiers are described as "Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed..." Owen puts across the truth to the reader about how the soldiers felt and looked like and it adds to how unpleasant the war was for the men "Men marched asleep. ...read more.

Conclusion

The fact that they "flung him in" says just how death at war was not respectable and every dead body was treated as a piece of meat not a human being anymore, surely this alone shows how unjust it was to die for your country. Owen gives us a detailed description of what it was personally like to be in the war, he writes in first person "I saw..." and describes one mans death which he experienced close up. Compared to Tennyson's impersonal "Nobel six hundred" which attacked and weren't taken by surprise while unprepared. Owen's wants us to imagine for ourselves what it was like as if we were there experiencing the ordeal and not to glorify the war anymore it is not a glorious thing. Tennyson wants us to think of the war as a Nobel thing to go and fight and it is honourable if you show braveness and fearlessness, the two poems are completely the opposite to each other. I think that out of the two 'Dulce' is the most touching and powerful, it is the closest you could get to war, the tragedy and pain without actually being there. It helps that Owen was there and can relate to the ordeal himself and so can help people to understand the truths and meanings of war, it uncovers lies of the propaganda and criticises war in general. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level War Poetry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level War Poetry essays

  1. Personal response to "Dolce et Decorum Est", "Disabled" and "The Charge of the Light ...

    It is as if they have become isolated within themselves. The next verse illustrates another side of war. It is the confusion and panic, which arises when the soldiers' lives are in immediate danger. The pace of this verse is a lot quicker in order to demonstrate this, and also

  2. A comparison of 'The Charge of the Light Brigade', 'Dulce Et Decorum Est'and 'Anthem ...

    The best that could be done is to 'Honour the charge they made, honour the Light Brigade, Noble six hundred', since, in the view of Tennyson, the charge of the Light Brigade was noble and brave as it was a worthwhile death.

  1. Analyse the two poems 'Dulce et Decorum est' by Wilfred Owen and 'Charge of ...

    I can't understand why somebody would kill another man in cold blood because he has been told to do so. This poem is strong, powerful and cleverly changes the minds of the audience; it uses effective language techniques and creates influential imagery.

  2. With detailed reference to

    The poem contains lots of anger and bitterness; the author is very sad and remorseful towards the bullies. It shows negativity as Andrew Peters is resentful and has a lot of anger he wants to relieve from his body and express within this poem, he empathizes on sorrow and fury.

  1. Compare and contrast the two poems "Dulce et Decorum Est" (Owen) with "Charge ...

    In this way, his poem becomes political as he is defending the "establishment" (where men were told, when they joined the army and sent to die, that they would die heroically, not as fools, despite being sent to the front line by generals far from danger).

  2. Confronting the Lies

    Soldiers however are considered to have a sense of pride, a sense of belonging and in the days of the First World War, were probably believed to be the backbone of the British society. Owen uses the word "haunting" in the third line that gives the idea of the war being a scary place.

  1. Compare and Contrast 'The Charge of the Light Brigade' with 'Dulce ET Decorum Est.'

    The deaths of these men were not in vain; they died for their Country, this is what makes them heroes. Verse one is setting the scene. It immediately starts with "Half a league, half a league, Half a league onward, All in the valley of Death" Tennyson is setting the pace at a gallop.

  2. comparison and contrast of two poems: 'The Charge of the Light Brigade' and 'Dulce ...

    They were mowed down mercilessly Alfred Lord Tennyson was not a soldier in the Light Brigade, he wasn't in any of the armed forces and he wasn't even present at the battle. In actual fact Tennyson was the Poet Laureate of Britain and was inspired to write the poem based on a newspaper article he had read on the Charge.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work