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Critical analysis of page 41-42 of the Great Gatsby

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Introduction

´╗┐Critical Analysis p41-42 Fitzgerald describes the ?music? coming from Gatsby?s house which is effectively used to foreshadow the images of music in the party later in the passage. He also uses the term ?summer nights? which presents the reader with the impression of a continuous party and demonstrates more clearly the hedonistic world that the rich inhabited in 1920s America which is further confirmed when Fitzgerald refers to the ?champagne? in the next sentence suggesting this expensive delicacy was the normality at these lavish parties. The ?blue gardens? in the following sentence gives the reader a vivid picture of the evening light whilst also using the metaphor to evoke a feeling of beauty regarding Gatsby?s party within the readers mind. The image of the comings and goings being ?like moths? gives the idea of the fleetingness of the upper class guests that have no real purpose or aims but to drift at these parties. ...read more.

Middle

The immensity of Gatsby?s parties is further shown through the statement that ?eight servants, including an extra gardener? had to work all of Monday to restore the mansion to its former grandeur and to get rid of the after effects of the party. The image of ?several hundred feet of canvas? being used just for Gatsby?s party once again indicates his enormous wealth and success and makes it more realistic to the reader by using measurements. Fitzgerald uses colour imagery to describe the party food such as ?glistening hors-d?oeuvre?, ?salads of harlequin designs? and ?turkeys bewitched to a dark gold?. This creates a more realistic and physical aspect to the food that makes it more vivid for the reader. The use of the ?dark gold? image also symbolises Gatsby?s wealth and the grandeur of the party. Fitzgerald combines the visual images of the ?gin?, ?liquors? and other drinks with the sound imagery of the ?oboes?, ?trombones? and other orchestra instruments in the following paragraph in order to appeal to more of the readers senses. ...read more.

Conclusion

There is further light imagery as it grows ?brighter? mentions of the ?sun? which evoke images of wealth and beauty. Fitzgerald creates both visual and sound imagery when he describes the ?yellow cocktail music? in which the light imagery again indicated wealth to the reader and also creates a soft, sensual feel. The ?opera of voices? further highlights the noise of the party and connects both the orchestra noise and that of the guests conversations. The groups changing ?swiftly? gives the impression of elegance and restlessness, as people are reluctant to stay in the same place as groups ?dissolve and form in the same breath?. Fitzgerald stresses the self obsessed, egotistical nature of the party guests when he reveals their aim; to become centre of attention which, when fulfilled, makes them ?excited with triumph?. The passage comes to a close with the ever recurring light imagery of the ?constantly changing light? perhaps symbolising not only the beauty of the scene but also the fleetingness of the people that inhabit it. ...read more.

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