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Describe the differences in register and Language in "Attack" by Siegfried Sassoon, "Anthem for Doomed Youth" by Wilfred Owen and "Slough" by John Betjemen.

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Introduction

Describe the differences in register and Language in "Attack" by Siegfried Sassoon, "Anthem for Doomed Youth" by Wilfred Owen and "Slough" by John Betjemen. These three poems are all about war. They focus on different aspects and are written in very different ways. They express different views and use different language. I am going to explain these differences and also the similarities. "Attack" by Siegfried Sassoon, is written in the third person, and it describes the situation in a reporting style. ...read more.

Middle

Then on the last line he states his opinion of horror and fear. "Anthem for Doomed Youth" the sonnet by Wilfred Owen is a very sombre poem. It is written as an extended metaphor, war is like a funeral. There are very few references to actual war. Owen uses alliteration "Stuttering rifles rapid rattle" and religious language "Orisons...Choirs...Bells". He does not talk about blood and gore. He uses a very solemn style and states his opinion more subtly than Siegfried Sassoon. ...read more.

Conclusion

He is a Luddite and very much against the change and over-development that has spread like a disease across Slough. All three poems have different ways of expressing their ideas through language and register. In "Attack" Sassoon uses description, personification and metaphors to put across his point. He sits back and lets the reader form their own opinion and then finishes with his. In "Anthem for Doomed Youth" Owen uses an extended metaphor, alliteration and personification to make his view heard. He takes a very sad attitude and uses solemn and religious language. ...read more.

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