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Describe the different attitudes to the Liverpool regional accent, both positive and negative.

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Introduction

Describe the different attitudes to the Liverpool regional accent, both positive and negative. There are many accents, which are familiar to us all, ranging from the Irish to the Birmingham accent. Everyone has their own opinions about these accents, especially the Liverpool accent. This is an accent that you either love or hate. Accents and dialects are very different. An accent is the way the language is pronounced and its characteristics of a region or social group. Whereas a dialect is the distinctive vocabulary and grammatical constructions used in an area within a language community. For example there is a Liverpool accent and the dialect that they use is very different as they use words such as, 'like' very often in sentences. The Liverpool accent is very popular, for both, negative and positive reasons. The people of Liverpool fell they are being discriminated against because of their strong regional accent. ...read more.

Middle

This is true of Tory MP, Edwina Currie. She was originally from Liverpool and has admitted to adapting her accent to the nature of her audience. There are many stereotypical views of the 'scouse' accent. Scousers are said to be uneducated, whiney, untrustworthy and have a thick, off-putting accent. At the BBC, programme controllers have often been criticised for permitting too many regional accents on the air. They have insisted with impeccable clarity that prejudice does not exist, 'We do not discriminate against accents and neither do we have a preferred regional accent.' On the other hand many people believe the 'scouse' accent to be a very positive accent, liked among many. Many believe that Liverpudlians are blessed with a great sense of wit and humour. As well as this the accent is very popular amoung call centres as the 'soft regional accent is seen to be friendly and could be helpful in building relationships.' ...read more.

Conclusion

In my opinion I find the Liverpool accent very friendly and warm. However it can become irritating after a while due to the high pitched nature of the accent. I believe that it is wrong to discriminate against any accent because everyone has an accent, no matter how strong or weak it is. People should respect different accents as they are part if our culture and society. To conclude it is fair to say that we all judge other accents, be it in positive or negative ways. When we are sure about our judgements of a particular accent we don't usually change them. Everyone has an accent, no matter how much we try to modify it. Accents make us who we are and build our idiolect. We shouldn't make judgements on how people sound and assume it is related to their lifestyle. The Liverpool accent is not only disliked, it is the same with Broad cockney, Geordie and Brummie, and everyone has their own preference. As Ken Dodd says, 'How you are received in the world depends largely on how you present yourself.' ...read more.

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