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Directing Act II - the balcony scene of Romeo and Juliet.

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Introduction

Romeo and Juliet Romeo and Juliet was originally a play written by William Shakespeare, who was a talented and popular playwright in the sixteenth and early seventeenth century. As there was no cinematography in his time, his plays were performed in theatres. As I am directing Act II - the balcony scene of Romeo and Juliet, I have many advantages. In this day and age, we have the latest equipment and techniques for filmmaking. As a director I have to consider many technical factors such as camera angle, lights, effects, props and costumes. I am not going to muddle with the story line, but will make some changes, which will differentiate my scene from the original. To present a good performance, I will have to take some imperative factors into account. Such as the place the scene has in the overall structure of the play, historical background, the setting, development of character, themes and the use of language. Let me begin by describing the place the scene has in the overall play. Originally before Act II in Act I, we are introduced to the feuding families of the Montague and the Capulet's. We learn that Romeo a youth, who is in despair with his unsuccessful love for a girl Rosanline, is the Montague's son. Eventually Romeo is persuaded by his friend Benvolio and Mercutio to go uninvited to a Capulet ball. There he meets Juliet who is the Capulet's daughter and falls in love with her at first sight. ...read more.

Middle

This was foolish of him as he was walking into a pit. Then when he is spying on Juliet, he expresses his feeling for Juliet to himself. He is idealistic about Juliet, for example " It is the east and Juliet is the sun!" Then eventually he becomes romantic and poetic, for example "It is my lady, O it is my love!" and "The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars, As daylight doth a lamp" and "Her eyes in heaven, Would through the airy region stream so bright, That birds would sing and think it were not night." He is very elaborative in his views about Juliet, such as "O speak again bright angel, for thou art". When Romeo meets Juliet he carries on the conversation delivering his dialogues in his poetic, romantic and idealistic way. At a point in the scene Romeo even wishes for physical desire. For example "O wilt thou leave me so unsatisdfied?"Eventually at the end of the scene he becomes mature and plain in his expressions. For example "By the hour of nine", he says this when Juliet asks him what time they should get married. Overall Romeo's character is unbalanced and not focused. He is immature in his approach and gradually matures by the end of the scene. Most of the time he expresses his love for Juliet in an idealistic, poetic and romantic way. He likes to flirt and tries to touch the sentiments of Juliet. ...read more.

Conclusion

They try to defy their parents and are not bothered about their family feud. This shows the difference between the mentalities of the two different generations. The last factor is the use of language. As I had mentioned earlier that I would be using modern spoken English in my film. I decided on this because first of all Shakespeare English at present has become extinct. In order to keep the attention of the audience grasped I would prefer normal English to be used. The original script was written in "blank verse", the form preferred by most dramatists in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. The original dialogues would require more practice to deliver. This is because the Shakespeare's dialogues had to be delivered with great fluency and control. The lines had to be said fast and rhythm maintained. Modern English would give the same effect that the original would, but it would be easier to convey the expressions and views in modern English. In Shakespeare's English as the lines were delivered one by the ideas also changed randomly. By using modern English the actor would be able to express his idea in an enhanced manner. Finally after considering all these factors, I believe that I will be able to make my performance successful. With the help of the knowledge attained from these factors I would be able to present an outstanding scene. I may affirm that besides the technical factors, these factors are equally important in making my film scene a plausible one. Kazam Raza G.C.S.E English Course Work ...read more.

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