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Discuss how Jane Austen presents Emma in chapter twenty four and at one other point in the novel?

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Introduction

Discuss how Jane Austen presents Emma in chapter twenty four and at one other point in the novel? The two chapters that I am going to be looking at are chapter sixteen and twenty four. Chapter sixteen fits into the novel on the whole as the first time Emma has to deal with something that has vexed her. Chapter twenty four on the other hand we learn further about how Emma's "fancy" has created a story about Jane Fairfax. Before these chapters, it is established that Emma is "handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition......with very little to distress or vex her". Furthermore we learn that Emma is in the class of the gentry and lives in Hartfield which intern due to society beliefs at the time encourage her to believe that her status makes her right all the time. We also find out that Emma follows her heart rather then her head, using her fancy rather then her intellect. This is shown when she tries to match make Harriet and Mr Elton which fails due to Mr Elton actually being interested in her. ...read more.

Middle

and then worrying about how Harriet will feel. Additionally the repetition of "such" does show that Emma has real remorse for what she has done. This reveals that Jane Austen may want us to feel sorry for Emma at this point of the novel. This is made further apparent when Emma says "she would have gladly have submitted to feel yet more mistaken-more in error-more disgraced by misjudgement, than she actually was, could the effects of her blunders have been confined to herself". The quote shows that Emma would rather feel worse then let Harriet find out that Mr Elton is not interested in her. Furthermore repetition of "more" also shows how badly she wished it was possible. But this also reveals that Emma may not be a true friend of Harriet's as she would rather lie then tell Harriet what happened. As chapter sixteen begins to come to a close Jane Austen reminds us of why Emma is the girl we love to hate. The quote "she stopt to blush as her own relapse" shows how quickly Emma gets over her problems and how her fancy quickly replaces her intellect. ...read more.

Conclusion

This ironic reaction from Emma due to Emma not actually liking Jane Fairfax clearly shows that Emma does value beauty and defend hers. This shows that Jane Austen approves of defending beauty. Emma's fancy begins to take hold of her intellect in this chapter when she starts to create the story about Jane Fairfax and Mr Dixon "one may guess what one chuses" This brings into question Emma's education and that although society perceives her as smart, at the moment she rarely gives anyone a reason to believe she is. In conclusion Jane Austen allows the reader to perceive Emma in many different ways throughout these two chapters. In chapter sixteen Emma can either be seen as a real friend of Harriet's who is dreading having to tell her about how Mr Elton really feels "Such a blow for Harriet-That was the worst of all". On the other hand Emma could actually just be looking out for herself and thinking that if she has tell Harriet about her plan failing and that she is not always right. Chapter twenty four illustrates how Emma's fancy really gets out of hand and how she thinks what she wants to believe. ?? ?? ?? ?? Hasan Khalifah English Lit ...read more.

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