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Discuss how Twain introduces three important strands into his narrative

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Introduction

Discuss how Twain introduces three important strands into his narrative The relationship between Huck and Jim develops throughout the novel. When Huck was younger Jim was merely a servant, and any form of friendship between the two would have been thought impossible due to the social and racial limitations of the South. However the similar circumstances of the two characters united them in a common aim - freedom. By creating this close relationship between a young white boy, and a black slave, Twain is smashing all the southern views that blacks are inferior. A boy of Huck's age is best used for this part as his mind is pure, and hasn't been corrupted with racism therefore will have no problems with being around Jim. ...read more.

Middle

This emphasizes the genuine care Jim possesses for Huck. At the same time this situation shows that Huck sees Jim as a friend, whom he can play jokes just as he would with any other boy. The impact upon Hucks character after being exposed to the harsh reality of southern life is represented by the Mississippi river. When he was living with Miss Watson, and also with Pap he was trapped, however now he is on the river he has escaped civilization, and is free to do as he please. At the start of the novel Huck was playing games that involved murder and robbery, now on the river he is face to face with such crimes. ...read more.

Conclusion

By exaggerating Huck's father as a gratuitously violent, worthless drunk, Twain intends to epitomize the southern males. In any normal society Pap would commend very little respect, however the southerners consider him superior to a respectable, educated black male. This shows just how ignorant and racist society in the south is. Huck and his friends earlier in the novel, along with Buck of the Grangerford family all look up to the violence around them. "I'm always kep' down; I don't get no show" (with reference to the lack of violence he has been involved in). Twain is showing that the views of the southern society will be passed on to generation after generation, resulting in a never-ending cycle of murder and thuggery, which is proven true by the way in which some southern states still live. ...read more.

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