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"Do you begin to see, then, what kind of world we are creating? It is the exact opposite of the stupid hedonistic utopias that the old reformers imagined." Discuss the anti-utopia that Orwell is portraying with reference to totalitarian regimes.

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Introduction

"Do you begin to see, then, what kind of world we are creating? It is the exact opposite of the stupid hedonistic utopias that the old reformers imagined." Discuss the anti-utopia that Orwell is portraying with reference to totalitarian regimes. Hitler, Stalin and Big Brother, tyrants all. Throughout Nineteen-Eighty Four, there are clear similarities between Winston's world and the totalitarian regimes that now form part of our history. However, as O'Brien goes on to explain, there are just as many differences. The concept of a 'utopia' was defined, although not invented, in a sixteenth century essay by Thomas More describing a perfectly ordered world wit complete equality. ...read more.

Middle

we are not like that.' In essence this reflects the belief that despots such as Hitler and other such 'reformers' took power for personal gain; this option not possible with an 'immortal party' sustained through the effort of many. Here people work for the party and not for themselves. Despite a strong secret police resembling the thought police and Stalin's purges communism failed due to human nature, namely greed. With Big Brother however this greed is replaced with selfless lunacy. It is then this factor which is key if 'The party's rule is [ to be ] forever.' Furthermore, as Winston suggests, despite his logical arguments, 'what can you do ... ...read more.

Conclusion

While they did not have 'telescreens' to control and supervise party members, both informers and the Gestapo were used by Hitler to infiltrate conspirators. The encouragement t denounce friends and family, as with the Parsons children turning their father in as a traitor, is clear evidence of a society based upon anti-utopian principles where hedonism is a crime, not a creed. O'Brien talks of old reformers seeking a 'paradise where human beings would be free'; however, these tightly controlled police states clearly conform with the concept of all human beings being 'free'. Orwell also demonstrates the propaganda and lies of the government in Winston's time and how the population is being misled. While the state apparently striving for success, in reality the party seeks only power. Oceania is described as a leak, war torn state ...read more.

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Response to the question

This is not an easy essay to tackle, but this candidate makes a stellar attempt. Through a sensitive appraisal of historical facts about totalitarian dictators like Hitler, Stalin, and Franco, the candidate is equipped to argue the differences and similarities ...

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Response to the question

This is not an easy essay to tackle, but this candidate makes a stellar attempt. Through a sensitive appraisal of historical facts about totalitarian dictators like Hitler, Stalin, and Franco, the candidate is equipped to argue the differences and similarities between these past dictatorships and the one Orwell presents as 'The Party' in his novel 'Nineteen Eighty-Four'. They chose well to explicitly link features of The Party's rule to history through direct comparisons, as it does make the task much easier and a lot more organised.

The structure of the answer is very well done, with the candidate's essay flowing beautifully through it's analysis. There is no definitive 'order', but it does read fluently and each paragraphs feels nicely rounded off before beginning a new chapter of analysis. Candidates are marked on their structure by examiners, and such a coherent, cohesive answer structured so well will only guarantee high marks for the ability to write a good essay.

Level of analysis

The Level of Analysis shown by this candidate is very good. It is not regimented or overly prescriptive, and nor does it feel confined by the simplicity of the PEE/C (Point, Evidence & Explanation/Comment) formula. That isn't to say that PEE/C isn't a winning method, as it can score very highly, but to reach the upper limits of the grade boundaries, I recommend something slightly more naturally flowing, like this essay. There are clear analytical points with embedded quotes to back them up (embedded quotes are useful because they greatly enhance to fluidity of the analysis), and there are insightful and interesting comments drawing comparisons between The Party/Big Brother and historical leaders of dictatorships, and the candidate is careful to ensure they do not make any comparative errors through a profound knowledge of the novel and the motives of O'Brien, The Party and Big Brother. It is important to have extensive knowledge of the novel in question, because examiners can always tell whether the candidate does or not, and it reflects very badly if errors are made.

Quality of writing

The Quality of Written Communication is fair and the candidate makes no large errors. There are however, frequent typing errors and oft some grammatical misprints of words like with the sentence "not surprise in a state which removes one's individually" which should read "Not surprising in a state which removes one's individuality". Errors like these feature throughout this essay, and whilst they are no hugely compromising of the clarity of what the candidate is trying to say, they are too frequent to not mention. I recommend a thorough read-through for any candidate - we all make errors, the majority of them without even realising, and these cannot be left to slip past final proof-reads and spell-checks that even computer can sometimes miss.


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