• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Dr Faustus - Consider Scene 5 (lines 167 to 280). What is the importance of this in context of the whole play? Consider: 16th century view of the presentation of the UniverseDramatic effects of good and evil angels

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Consider Scene 5 (lines 167 to 280). What is the importance of this in context of the whole play? Consider: 16th century view of the presentation of the Universe Dramatic effects of good and evil angels Language used by Faustus and Mephastophilis Scene 5 is a particularly significant scene in the play, which is hinted at by its relatively large length, due to the many issues it addresses including the presentation of the Universe, doubt over whether Faustus will repent and the interesting dialogue between Faustus and Mephastophilis. Lines 167 to 280 contain much of this therefore making this passage, in itself, one of high importance in reference to the whole play. The good and evil angels offer the passage much drama due to the effect they have on Faustus. ...read more.

Middle

They order him 'to talk of the devil' rather than of Christ and they suggest, as does the evil angel, that Faustus is unable to repent. However, this is certainly not true because they would not be so concerned with the actions of Faustus if there was no possibility of him repenting. The general uncertainty over whether Faustus will repent or not is highly dramatic and is essentially presented in the form of the good and evil angels. In this respect the good and evil angels also represent the two sides of Dr Faustus. This is evident all throughout the play as we see that Faustus often does not act in an evil manner; it is influence from others that push him to act in certain ways. ...read more.

Conclusion

The refusal to reveal too much: 'I will not tell thee', because it might lead Faustus to repent as God would be revealed to have made the World, almost results in the repentance of Faustus anyway. Even here Mephastophilis appears to be controlling the situation because he orders Faustus to 'move me not' suggesting that he is just toying with Faustus and that he may refuse to comply with the requests of Faustus whenever he wishes to do so. Despite these clear signs of contempt Faustus stills sees himself as the one who should be giving the orders as he mocks Mephastophilis: 'Hath Mephastophilis no greater skill?' but he does not realise that this attitude will remain constant throughout the play. A high proportion of the dialogue between Mephastophilis and Faustus contains references to the presentation of the Universe. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Christopher Marlowe section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Christopher Marlowe essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    It has been suggested that Marlowe's audience would have seen Dr Faustus as a ...

    3 star(s)

    from the divine path, and entices him towards blasphemy and heresy, with the promise of honour and wealth. This is a very grave situation of morality, where a person is asked to choose between right and wrong. Morals usually influence our judgements, but if a person does not have morals,

  2. "An impressive opening, a marvellous ending, an indifferent middle". Does this twentieth century comment ...

    beginning, and the fact that he struggles alone maintains the dramatic tension right up until he is taken to hell. Marlowe purposefully ends the play with Faustus' soliloquy, to vocalise his inner thought and emotional condition. His terror, frantic hopes and despair are all enhanced by the soliloquy, which gains dramatic power by its graphic, physical nature.

  1. Free essay

    Compare the first and final soliloquies in Dr Faustus - is Faustus a hero ...

    he maintains to the end his individuality of mind..." Faustus does take responsibility for his actions during the final soliloquy, "curse thyself" and the moving poetry of his final hour is said with dignity. His ambition and aspirations in this aspect have not been in vain, he has achieved what

  2. Choruses - what is the importance of these speeches in 'Dr. Faustus?

    Indeed, the final Chorus speech alliterates Faustus's 'fiendful fortune', which seems to summarise exactly where Fasustus twenty-four years of ''voluptuousness'' gave him. This major theme of ''overreaching'' is heavily emphasised in this opening speech, demonstrated by using language connected to greed and appetite.

  1. Discuss the presentation of Faustus' inner conflict in Act 1 scene 5 of Doctor ...

    Therefore if there is no clear distinction between the two in terms of costume, Faustus and indeed the audience may not have immediately been able detect which one was evil. This would have created a degree of intrigue for the audience and engrossed them more intensely in the fate of Faustus.

  2. In what ways and with what effects does 'Dr. Faustus' question the acquisition and ...

    105-7), however when granted the power he uses it to gain fame among royalties and uses his powers for his own personal pleasure and status as told by the chorus: 'Now is his fame spread forth in every land'. 5 (viii.

  1. Comment on the relationship between the comic and serious material in Dr Faustus.

    Wagner then offers to teach the clown shape-shifting tricks "I will teach thee to turn thy self to a dog.." which draws great parallels with the next scene in which Mephastophilis responds to Faustus' question of " But may I raise up spirits when I please" with " Ay Faustus, and do greater things than these".

  2. What does Marlowe's presentation of Mephastophilis tell an audience about Sixteenth Century ideas of ...

    Mephastophilis replies "Why this is hell, nor am I out of it". Marlowe creates a subtle version of hell here. The Elizabethan audience would have thought that hell was an actual physical place and people were damned if they committed any of the seven deadly sins that's why people used to model there life's around the seven deadly sins.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work