• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Dracula Essay. Focussing on chapter fourteen, to what extent do you think that, in Dracula, Stoker cannot provide answers to every question?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Focussing on chapter fourteen, to what extent do you think that, in Dracula, Stoker cannot provide answers to every question? During the Victorian era the advancement of technology was immense. Van Helsing and Dr Seward are the two characters who do the most debating on science and scientific method. In chapter fourteen Dr Seward describes his predicament: 'I do not know what to think, and I have no data on which to found a conjecture'. It is, therefore, quite clear that these two characters face difficulties, this is because, the supernatural events in Dracula conflict with their rational and religious beliefs. ...read more.

Middle

This early introduction of supernatural phenomena prepares the reader for the horrific and violent acts in the novel, whilst also, presenting a sense of uncertainty as there appears to be no explanation for these uncanny events. It could, therefore, be suggested that Stoker is setting up the idea that there is not always an answer to every question. Van Helsing acknowledges that there are some 'possible impossibilities', thus, it would seem that he is characterised by Stoker as pivotal within the novel, as more then just a man of science, but as a character who believes - and is aware - that there are some questions that do not have answers. ...read more.

Conclusion

It would therefore seem that Stoker does not have an answer for everything, this is perhaps epitomised by Reinfield who is characterised as a madman who clearly does not conform to normal human behaviour. The mystery of Reinfield's madness consequently places the idea that Stoker cannot provide answers to every question at the forefront of the readers mind, this is because the character is presented as 'unlike the normal lunatic' with no reason or explanation given within the novel regarding the reason of his mad and erratic ways. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Bram Stoker section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a star student thought of this essay

3 star(s)

Response to the question

This essay has potential when responding to the question, picking up swiftly that the main focus should be on the struggle of supernatural against science and technological changes. However, there simply isn't enough discussion here to build a cogent argument. ...

Read full review

Response to the question

This essay has potential when responding to the question, picking up swiftly that the main focus should be on the struggle of supernatural against science and technological changes. However, there simply isn't enough discussion here to build a cogent argument. There needs to be exploration of why Stoker does not provide answers for every question, and how this exacerbates the terror surrounding Dracula's supernatural.

Level of analysis

The analysis is quite basic, and although I agree science and technology are hard to analyse in a literary context, the supernatural is not. At times this essay tends to narrate, for example "Van Helsing is extremely open-minded". Retelling the story won't gain you many marks, and at A-Level you should be able to discuss specific techniques and the effects they have on the reader. There is very little focus on how the reader respond to Stoker's work, and what purpose his novel has. By looking at authorial intent, you naturally begin to address the question, and thus form a more convincing argument.

Quality of writing

I quite like the style here, with phrases such as "It could, therefore, be suggested that Stoker" showing the examiner you are able to evaluate numerous interpretations. This is a great skill to have, and will be rewarded if you can use counter-arguments and show them as weak to make your own point of view stronger. Spelling, punctuation and grammar are fine, but as mentioned above this essay is limited by its length. Essays at A-Level must be substantial, and unfortunately this essay has not met this criteria.


Did you find this review helpful? Join our team of reviewers and help other students learn

Reviewed by groat 27/06/2012

Read less
Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Bram Stoker essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    To what extent is Dracula a conventional Gothic protagonist

    4 star(s)

    Stoker presents Dracula as having tragic stature through his loneliness and sadness that his once noble family have been destroyed. Dracula tells Harker that he longs: "to be in the midst of the whirl and rush of humanity, to share its life, its change, its death, and all that makes it what it is.

  2. Peer reviewed

    Analysis of Vampire Scene in Chapter 3 Dracula

    3 star(s)

    In Chapter three Harker seeks comfort in a room "where, of old, ladies had sat and sung and lived sweet lives whilst their gentle breasts were sad for their menfolk away in the midst of remorseless wars." He seeks safety and comfort in familiarity, however within the place where he

  1. Dracula has been described as a novel of Gothic horror(TM) " considering in detail ...

    The motif of the three evil women alludes to the witches in Macbeth. The use of a familiar motif imbues the vampires with myth and folklore. Harker spends a lot of time wondering whether what he experiences and the visions of both repulsion and delight are real.

  2. A Critical Analysis of Dracula pg. 41

    The fact that Harker recognises the count 'by the neck' immediately conjures imagery of biting and blood, reinforcing the reader's inference that he is a vampire. Vampirism stands as a metaphor for promiscuous sexuality, as shown later in the chapter.

  1. Explore the ways in which suffering is presented in Enduring love and The new ...

    His particular use of the word ?decent?8 connotes doubt in the narration. We begin to question Joes character as he fears ?don?t leave me with my mind? leading us to examine whether Jed is mad or Joe. Joes ?emotional condition, the mental visceral?10 was his ?fear of the future? Saying

  2. CONSIDERING IN DETAIL ONE OR TWO PASSAGES, DISCUSS WAYS IN WHICH STOKERS DESCRIPTIONS OF ...

    The imposing architecture of this part is very effective, and it clearly has an intimidating impact on Jonathan. The above quote is taken from the second chapter and begins with Jonathan awaiting admittance at the entrance of Castle Dracula. The monumental scale of the vast ruin gives the impression of a once colossal power and evokes resonances of supernatural fears.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work