• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Duffy presents us with characters that conform to gender expectations, reinforcing gender stereotypes. To what extent do you agree with this view?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Duffy presents us with characters that conform to gender expectations, reinforcing gender stereotypes. To what extent do you agree with this view? Little Red-Cap is a twist on the classic fairytale written by the Brothers Grimm. Throughout the poem Duffy appears to present a character who rebels rather than conforms to gender expectations, she instead seems to reinforce the idea that it is not necessary to conform to Gender stereotypes. From the beginning of the poem, the protagonist describes a place referred to as 'childhood's end', as she leaves this place and reaches the edge of the woods she first comes into contact with the wolf, (an older man whom the narrator, Little Red-Cap, initiates a relationship with,) ...read more.

Middle

This being said, it still appears as if the wolf has some sort of advantage in the relationship as the young girl claims to take 'lesson' from him. The wolf is portrayed as cultured, 'reading his verse out loud.' It could be argued that Little Red-Cap is more interested in what she can learn from the wolf than the wolf himself, describing the wall of books in his lair as 'crimson, gold' and 'aglow.' 'Poetry,' she states, is the reason behind her interest in him, 'Words, words were truly alive on the tongue, in the head?warm, beating, frantic, winged; music and blood,' it is at this point that the narrative reaches its peak of intensity, therefore illustrating that she is passionate about the knowledge she can gain from the wolf. ...read more.

Conclusion

Here she finds the 'glistening, virgin white' bones of her grandmother in his stomach, further signifying that things have ended differently in the past and that the wolf's actions have been repeated, this in a sense supports the gender stereotype in terms of male promiscuity. Considering the nature of the fairytale in which this poem takes inspiration, the relationship between Little Red-Cap and the wolf seems doomed from the beginning. Someone would, inevitably, be consumed and the fact that it was the wolf makes the statement: gender does not dictate the outcome of a relationship. Indeed, the poem could be described as an example of a feminist view on relationships but as well as thins it criticizes the social conditions that separate genders and the options available to them rather following gender stereotypes. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Carol Ann Duffy section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Carol Ann Duffy essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    To what extent do you agree with the view that Duffy presents the female ...

    3 star(s)

    There is a lot of colloquial language in this poem such as "in the interval I made sure he spotted me, sweet sixteen... babe, waif... I stitched him up... I first... I took... I crept... I lost... I slid... I knew...

  2. How does Swindells effectively create and integrate the characters of Link and Shelter into ...

    Shelter's accounts seem almost emotionless, whereas on the other hand Link shows us an array of emotions in his slightly embittered account. Link goes through an array of emotions in short measures of time. At first we hear him in his cynical yet depressed state, "I'm invisible see?"

  1. Little Red Cap revises Little Red Riding Hood in order to explore a rite ...

    The internal rhyme of "might" and "why" bring naivety to Red Cap once again. Her naive simple rhyme shows the last scraps of her innocence, a simple reminder that this was once a children's tale. It is important also that the wolf is not the reason she chooses this life for herself.

  2. Duffy - Little Red

    Further, it is described as a "thorny" place suggesting that she can not move figuratively (in the sense that she can not grow academically); this also creates a strong picture in the reader's mind of a "babe" vulnerable to be hurt.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work