• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

"Dulce et Decorum Est," by Wilfred Owen, "Exposure," by Wilfred Owen, "Perhaps," by Vera Brittain - Explain what the writers of these poems thought about the war and how their poems show a change in the way that war was depicted.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

English - course work. "Dulce et Decorum Est," by Wilfred Owen "Exposure," by Wilfred Owen "Perhaps," by Vera Brittain Explain what the writers of these poems thought about the war and how their poems show a change in the way that war was depicted. Wilfred Owen and Vera Brittain where poets of the First World War. The three poems "Dulce et Decorum Est", "Exposure" and "Perhaps" are very different from each other, discussing the horror of war and the loss through their experiences. They wanted the people of England to know what war was really like. All of the poets use an attack approach at people like Jesse Pope who wrote to promote war. The first poem "Dulce et Decorum Est" describes to those in England what the war was like. Owen uses good word play in the title "Dulce et Decorum Est", which is Latin meaning "It is a sweet and seemly (glorious) thing", and at the end he repeats the title but adding at the end of it, "Pro patria mori", which means "to die for your country". In this poem Owen describes how it is not a 'Sweet and seemly (glorious) thing to die for your country." Owen does this by starting the poem describing how the men of war come of the battlefield thinking about their rest to come. ...read more.

Middle

'We only know war lasts, rain socks, and clouds sag stormy. Dawn missing in the east her melancholy army'. 'Stormy' and 'army' are the words that half rhyme because they vaguely sound alike. Owen explains that there was not only the enemy across no-mans land but the wind was also their enemy. 'In the merciless iced east winds that knive us,' this shows exactly how awful and cold the wind was. As it hit them it was like their enemy throwing knives at them. Owen describes how quiet it was. 'Worried by silence, sentries whisper, curious, nervous.' Owen uses here good alliteration and sibilants. There are 6 S's in this sentence. All the words are quiet words making it a quiet sentence and that's exactly what its meant to be. He says how in the silence he can 'hear the mad tugging on the wire.' It was the wind tugging on the wire. 'Like twitching agonies of men among its brambles', Owen uses an interesting simile here. He is describing the barbed wire to brambles. As the wind tugs on the barbed wire it reminds him of the men who got caught on it and are left to die. As the dawn begins, all Owen knows is that 'rain soaks and clouds sag stormy.' The clouds are like the dawn's army. ...read more.

Conclusion

Spring is a symbol of new life, summer things flourish and autumn is the time of harvest. Too her winter only means death. In the future she hopes that things will be good, that she will some day come to terms with her lost. She will be able to see things as she used to. 'And I shall see that the skies are blue,' she hopes that someday in the future she will see blue skies again. 'And I shall find the white May-blossoms sweet,' she hopes she will find this and all the other things how they used to before her loved one died. Wilfred Owen and Vera Brittain both have views of what the war was like. Wilfred Owen didn't like the war because innocent people were killed and men often forced to go. He also went through all the extreme conditions of being on the battlefield. He saw death in his face and had to cope with it. His consequence was that he was aged by the experience of war. Vera Brittain disliked the war because it was not just those fighting how got hurt it was also those back home that got hurt. Many of them losing loved ones, which aged them while caught up in their misery. I think that the views of both poets are quite different but are the truth about what war really is and brings. It is a waste of time and most important, life! Hannah Condon. 10 CW ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level War Poetry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level War Poetry essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    'Who for the Game' By Jesse Pope, 'Dulce Et Decorum Est' By Wilfred Owen, ...

    4 star(s)

    "My friend, you would not tell with such high zest to children or ardent for some desperate glory." Owen is saying that if you could see the things he had seen then you would not believe the lie. By saying this he is expressing the bitterness he has not only for the army but the situation as a whole.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    The poem that I have chosen to analyse is "Exposure" by Wilfred Owen.

    3 star(s)

    A quote from verse 3 sums up the theme in it entirety: "war lasts, rain soaks, and clouds sag stormy." This quote is to reflect the men's feelings. They feel that the war will never end, the weather is wearing them away and the future doesn't look bright either.

  1. How does Wilfred Owen present the horror of war in 'Dulce et Decorum est'. ...

    It is almost a quiet poem and very respectful. The lines that most affect me are "They shall not grow old as we that are left grow old: Age hall not weary them nor the year condemn." This is makes me feel sad as they cannot grow old because they were killed at a young age.

  2. A comparison of 'Dulce Et Decorum Est' and 'Exposure' by Wilfred Owen, showing ...

    Whilst Owen was in the hospital, Siegfried Sassoon arrived. Owen made a good impression on Sassoon and he recognized the potential in his poetry. Encouraged by Sassoon, Owen wrote some of his finest, most angry and compassionate poems at that time.

  1. How is the horror of war, and the poets'criticism of war conveyed in the ...

    The army generals are calling this a scrap like it's a fight between boys at school. Sassoon calls the army generals "Finally, Sassoon rounds the poem of with a phrase by reinforcing that they are unfit and fat. He also shows that those at the front line could die any

  2. Based on the Poem "Dulce et Decorum Est" by Wilfred Owen.

    These comparisons illustrate the point so vividly that they increase the effectiveness of the poem. The most important means of developing the effectiveness of the poem is the graphic imagery. They evoke such emotions so as to cause people to become sick.

  1. Compare and Contrast, The shock and horror presented in the three war poems - ...

    I am in, as I looks around and see that my inmates and I are all trapped. We are having to wear these repellent plain grey hospital clothes, 'Shivered in his ghastly suit of grey', we can also compare this evidence with the soldiers in Dulce et Decorum Est, as

  2. Compare two poems which show how Wilfred Owen was influenced by the experience of ...

    Similarly, 'Dulce et Decorum est' involves Owen witnessing the death of fellow soldier in a gas attack. Obviously, the events of the Sommes affected him immensely. 'Dulce et Decorum est' is directed to all those brain washed by the propaganda of war.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work