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".....Emma had very early forseen how useful she might find her..." How does this evocation fit with your reading of the relationship between Emma and Harriet?

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Introduction

"...Emma had very early foreseen how useful she might find her...; a Harriet Smith, one whom she could summon at any time for a walk, would be a valuable addition to her privileged." How does this evocation fit with your reading of the relationship between Emma and Harriet? The above quote epitomises the way Emma feels about Harriet at the beginning of the book, Emma. Jane Austen manages to show us Emma's view without using speech allowing the reader to feel as though they are reading her thought processes thus trusting the narrative to be Emma's true feelings on the matter of Harriet Smith, and showing her traits clearly. The relationship between Emma and Harriet in the novel reveals arrogance and superiority in the character of Emma. Her treatment of Harriet is as though Harriet is not a person with individual feelings but almost pet-like able to be "summoned at any time for a walk." Through out the novel we see how Emma gradually realises her terrible and patronising treatment of Harriet and begins to act towards and see Harriet in a different light. Emma primary motive to call upon Harriet to be her friend was only to prevent boredom not that "poor Miss Taylor left to become married. ...read more.

Middle

Though Emma never directly says to Harriet that she is lucky to have her company this is always inferred by Jane Austen in Emma's diction and the narrative. It is also clear that Harriet does feel grateful for the attention received from Miss Woodhouse, "...for I am never happy but at Hartfield," Harriet is so delighted to be accepted in the Woodhouse's home that she feels she wishes to stay there, she holds on to her acceptance into higher class, she is delighted by every welcome and compliment from Emma, and Emma in her ability to create admiration for herself, helps to make Harriet feel so appreciative towards herself. The relationship between the two characters always seems as though Emma is constantly giving Harriet favours by allowing her to stay at Hartfield, by introducing her into polite society, and by finding her a superior wedding match. However all of these so called favours end up being but the opposite of Harriet and in the end prevent all kinds of happiness for the character. Harriet's time, mostly spent at Emma's home prevented a meeting between her and Mr Martin and the introduction into Emma's class stopped Harriet from being with the people she loved and felt so happy amongst, The Martin family, and Emma's attempts at matchmaking only cause more sadness and embarrassment for Harriet as she has to refuse Mr Martin only to be then refused herself. ...read more.

Conclusion

With the revelation that Emma is yet again wrong about Mr Knightly and in fact he requites her love there is a happy ending for the characters who maintain their friendship and which may change without Emma as the superior character within it, as she learns from her mistakes and becomes more humble and down to earth. Therefore although the evocation fits with the relationship between Emma and Harriet during the main of the novel, Emma leading Harriet for her own amusement and Harriet obediently following, the ending of the play shows the beginning of a change in this pattern. Harriet's new marriage symbolises a new independent direction for herself a life free of intervention from Miss Woodhouse. Emma's marriage to Mr Knightly gives her a new focus of attention and relief from boredom and also a satisfaction that the character wasn't even aware she needed, but as soon she joins with Mr Knightly there is a sense of completion in the character and the tone of narrative by Jane Austen. So it is evident that the evocation is true for most of the novel however Jane Austen is able to show a change in character of her heroine by the comparison of behaviour towards Harriet. ...read more.

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