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Emma is a witty and intelligent woman, trapped in a society which is unable to fulfil her needs.'In the light of this quotation, explore Austen's presentation of Emma.

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Introduction

English Literature Emma 'Emma is a witty and intelligent woman, trapped in a society which is unable to fulfil her needs.' In the light of this quotation, explore Austen's presentation of Emma. 'Emma is a witty and intelligent woman, trapped in a society which is unable to fulfil her needs.' I agree with this statement to a certain extent. Though in the beginning of the novel, Emma is portrayed to be a very happy, swaggering young lady 'handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition', Austen slowly but efficiently, shows the reader the concept of misjudgements, the irony of first impressions and the misconceptions we and other's receive of people's happiness and capability. Initially, Emma appears to be very proud and even arrogant. From chapter one, we can see Emma is immature and vain. She predicts Miss Taylor and Mr. Weston's love match, and feels very proud of her 'success'. Here Emma undervalues others, in thinking only she could bring couples together. Though at the time, we do not understand how bored and lonely Emma is, we soon come to realise that she is not absolute with herself and seeks for happiness and companionship, but is too blinded ...read more.

Middle

He is shown as a very fussy man, and it is soon clear to us that his personality and selfish ways, plays a huge part in Emma's childish and confused manner. Through the novel the persona explains of his need of comfort and warmth, but at times it seems ridiculous to not only the reader, but also the characters. Many of them complain, though secluding Mr. Knightley being very understanding and friendly towards Mr. Woodhouse at all times. Emma is the one person who has had to deal with all his complaints and whinging throughout most of her life, and Austen makes us realise that she does have troubles and a lot to deal with, which helps us understand her character more, which ables us to see the kind hearted girl she really is. The persona presents Emma in a very fascinating manner. From very early on, it is hard to see or recognise Emma's good qualities, but as the novel progresses it is easier to understand Emma's feelings in general, but also as a real person. Throughout her development Mr Knightley has acted as her 'mentor', which helps her realise her mistakes and misjudgements, whilst also showing her that she is not superior to anybody else, (although she was brought up thinking so). ...read more.

Conclusion

This makes us see Emma as a true person, which friends and people around her find it very hard to do so, as it seems as though she hides her feelings and always puts on the same happy act. At the start of the novel she is a very bored girl, and acts on her bored instincts to meddle in other's personal lives. The reason why she does so is because she has not concentrated on herself and her needs, in order to please others. This society has held her back, but her intelligent and sharp ways shine through in the end. This is to do with Mr. Knightley's caring, but stern ways, which helps her to find herself. At the end we see that all the games she played and the errors she made have made her a better person. At first she would not let her true feelings out, but once she admits and realises her love for Mr. Knightley, and all her mistakes and bad judgments, she is able to fulfil her needs, and seems as though she is happy and will be comfortable with her decisions. ?? ?? ?? ?? Stephanie Michaelides ...read more.

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