• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Employment opportunities of women in Britain during the first world war.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The Home Front Assignment One: Objective 1 1. Describe the employment opportunities of women in Britain in 1914 at the outbreak of war. (15) 2. Why did the number of women employed in Britain begin to rise significantly from mid-1915? (15) 3. In what ways did the First World War change the employment opportunities of women in Britain? (20) Name : Cary Yu Form : 10M Candidate Number : 3805235 School : West Island School Question 1: Describe the employment opportunities of women in Britain in 1914 at the outbreak of war. During the outbreak of war in 1914, women were considered as less capable than men were. It was a traditional trend that women would get married and had children. Therefore parents would not send young girls to school after the age of 12 even if they did win a scholarship. Only 1% of those staying on were women. That was the reason why most of British women had lack of sufficient education to put themselves in professions like doctors, lawyer or teachers. People just thought women just were not as good as men. As second class citizens, they were not allowed to involve in any politics as they were expected to stay home and be a good wife of a husband, a good mother of children. They could not divorce with their husband easily and divorced women were not allowed to see their children. ...read more.

Middle

Results were that more than 400,000 women entered the work force. It was a fact by then that women were desperately needed to replace the jobs of men. The event of Great shell shortage would then open a new chapter of women in Britain. In 1915, David Lloyd George ordered for more weaponry and ammunition, which meant that many more workers would be needed. Women were then employed and had the chance to prove that they could work as well as men. The Great Shell Shortage not only brought women into the war effort in large numbers but also changed the attitude of society towards women. They were not just delicate girls that sat at home for most of the day but were working in "men's" jobs. The Government was forced to employ more women as the war continued. This opened up more employment opportunities for women. By the end of 1915, more men volunteered for service. With an army that big, more supplies of munitions were needed. There weren't enough men to supply them and women had to take the place of men in the newly opened factories. However, the greatest change came when men were conscripted into the army. All men that were strong and able to work were conscripted into the army leaving behind only the old, the young and women. ...read more.

Conclusion

These women would have to rely on the pre-war traditional occupations. Moreover, girls' education remained unchanged because of the debts that Britain owed to the U.S.A. With the financial problems Britain was facing, most of the families could not afford to invest on their daughters' education. This caused the women hard to expand their employment opportunities any further. In the long term however, WWI was seen as the turning point of women roles because it gave the chance to women to prove that they were capable than believed and could work up to men's standard. Some however might argued that the lack of education of lower and middle class women could still lowered the job opportunities. Yet, as the women have won their respect from WWI and are enabled to vote in 1918, they would eventually have the power to fight for their equal right to demolish the laws and lengthen their education. Furthermore, women were socially more acceptable to many different jobs which later increased the employment opportunities for women. In 1918, the proportion of women works rose strikingly in public transport (for example, from 18,000 to 117,000 bus conductors), 9,500 to 63,700 banking, and 505,000 to 934,000 commerce, so ultimately the proportion of women employed grew after the war. The laws now weren't "The laws that men have made." Said Emmeline Pankhurst. The right to vote could then change their lives, which resulted in a forever changes of women employment opportunities. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level War Poetry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level War Poetry essays

  1. In the wars, Robert Rose is a very significant character.

    It is quite ironic that after Rowena's death, Robert wanted to join the army where death loomed on every horizon. If Rowena had still been alive Robert probably would not have ever enlisted in the army. In the structure of Robert and Rowena's relationship, the author is attempting to reveal

  2. How Did the Blitz Affect Everyday Life in Britain?

    Only happy films and love films were wanted, people wanted nothing about the war to be seen. Some people liked to dance; there were dances everywhere. All over the country there were thousands of sailors, soldiers and airmen. They all wanted to dance and meet girls.

  1. Describe the employment opportunities of women in Britain in 1914 at the outbreak of ...

    For the owners of sweatshops, women were seen as an easy target. They could be bullied in to doing more work and if they complained then simple - they would lose their jobs. Unfortunately for women, even trade unions couldn 't be set up to protect them because there were

  2. In what ways did the First World War change the employment opportunities of woman ...

    The government did not realise women whose husbands had died needed to get jobs that paid a descent wage to support the family. Women stood their ground and did not revert back to household jobs as statistics show an 82% drop in employment in domestic work.

  1. Why did the number of women employed in Britain begin to rise significantly from ...

    Nearly a million women were employed in munitions by 1918. But with more shells, there were more casualties and a lot of women were needed for nursing. Some even worked close to the front line in dressing stations. Nursing employed thousands of women - more nurses were needed than ever before.

  2. In what ways did the First World War change the employment opportunities of women ...

    In 1914 roughly a quarter of the total female population were working (women 23.7 million, 5.9 million working). In 1914 after the beginning of the war about 470,000 women were working in jobs connected with the war by 1918 this had risen to approximately 1,354,000 of these jobs less than half 552,000 jobs were direct replacements of men's jobs.

  1. In what ways did the First World War change the employment opportunities of women ...

    Before world war one, women did low-paid jobs, like dressmakers and servants for example. This changed during the First World War (1914-1918). Men had to leave the their jobs to join the army, so all the men's jobs became vacant.

  2. Aftermath of WWI.

    Instead, an armistice was signed as a cease fire between the Triple Alliance and the Triple Entente. The only thing that this hopeful piece of paper did was delay the start of World War II. This "ink waster" was nothing but a twenty year cease fire between Germany and the World.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work