• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

English is not dying but for several reasons it is going through a phase of rapid change, probably more rapid than any it has gone through before.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

English is not dying but for several reasons it is going through a phase of rapid change, probably more rapid than any it has gone through before. The English language is always changing, however, at the moment it is going through a phase of rapid change, more so than ever before. This more recent change, I believe, is due to mass media and advances in science and technology global communications (Including SMS messaging, the internet, e-mail and other advances in). Due to being almost flooded with American television adverts and programmes, the English language is taking on board Americanisms, both the pronunciation of words and their spelling. Words such as "colour" in England have been changed in America to "color" and now, with American advertisements, television programmes/films and American written software packages flooding into England, people are slowly adopting the American ways of spelling and speaking. Also abbreviations are catching on and creeping into our language. People are always looking for an easy alternative, and so, instead of typing out how you feel, people are starting to use 'emoticons'. ...read more.

Middle

If new words were not created to compensate for the developments and discoveries, we would be left saying things like "machine for performing calculations", "device for receiving streaming visual and audio", "instrument for transmitting and receiving electromagnetic waves". I believe it is safe to assume we would rather have one word that means what ten words could describe. As well as the introduction of words, emoticons, and the spelling and pronunciation of words changing, their meanings can also change. A "creek" in British English, means 'a tidal inlet of the ocean, or a large river' but American English uses it in the sense of any small stream. Other words have different meanings, depending on the context in which they are used (e.g. "a fine day", "fine silk", "she is fine"). Looking further back at the English language, we can see that it is a mongrel language, comprised and influenced by many other languages. There are some obvious traces of the Celtic influence upon our language, words such as "mug, post, dam, clout" still remain in use today, as well as some place names "Avon", "York", "Thames" and "Leeds" being examples. ...read more.

Conclusion

'Beef' is a derivative from 'le boeuf', which is a French word, as is 'le porc' which is where 'pork' derived from, we also have the word 'pig'. Around this time was the start of the Great Vowel Shift. When William Caxton invented the printing press, gradually there was a standard form of English developing. Before, people were spelling phonetically, and so, different accents had different spellings. This period is known as Early Modern English. Many more words entered the language than at any other period. New words were needed for new concepts and an influx of French and Latin words were the result of this. Other words were brought in from the languages of Africa and Asia due to world exploration. At this time, the Great Vowel Shift was completed and the language began to stabilise. Around the 1700's, the dictionary was introduced. Writers tried to fix spellings and define word meanings. This led to vocabulary and grammar being defined, rules laid down for correct language usage and a model for English dictionary writers. Following this, the development of Rail, colonial expansion, the spread of literacy and education along with printing extended the access to standard and written forms of English. The English Language is always developing, changing and growing, it truly is a living language. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Language: Context, Genre & Frameworks section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Language: Context, Genre & Frameworks essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    Investigation into the Judgements of Slang

    4 star(s)

    Looking at this "good citizen" rating, we see the same pattern emerge: Again, a direct correlation is visible between how favourably the speaker is looked upon and the degree of slang they use. ............................................................................................................................. Conclusions We can confidently assert that in this study there is an evident relationship between slang usage and the judgements made of individuals.

  2. Language Change: from Old English to Modern English.

    In the following discussion of the Old English case system I will also compare aspects of the Old English system with the Modern German one. This is because, "Old English had morphology very similar to that of German today... For each individual are of inflectional morphology...

  1. With the use of specific examples, discuss the ways and means in which writers ...

    Below is another extract from the book "Ulysses" by novelist James Joyce where none of the sentences apart from the narrative ones, are grammatically correct or complete by strict standards. Yet one is drawn to the characters not by being told about them, but by sharing their most intimate thoughts, represented as silent, spontaneous streams of consciousness.

  2. Language Change.

    Such changes (in European languages) include tense and mood of verbs, gender of nouns, case or number of nouns, agreement of adjectives, and other distinctions. Old English was a highly inflected language. Modern English is relatively uninflected. Adverbs, adjectives, prepositions, conjunctions and interjections are invariable.

  1. The Influence of English Mass Culture on Estonia

    to say that an absence of linguistic ability can be a severe handicap. What can be done to steer the right course between authoritarian linguistic policies, which are incompatible with our liberal conception of culture and education, and a laissez-faire policy that would lead to a misconceived homogenization under the

  2. Do you detect any general trend or trends in the pattern of English politics ...

    The evidence is not sufficient to suggest that they had control as far north as the Humber, but we would be unwise to dismiss the idea that these kings had some form of overlordship over much of southern England. Furthermore, Keynes is sceptical about Aethelbert of Kent's power, suggesting that

  1. How Has English changed as a result of contact with other languages? What other ...

    The next major influence was a Danish one, from AD.787 until the 11th Century. The Danelaw boundary was worked out with King Alfred which saw co-operative trading and then 25 years of Danish rule from AD.991. The result was settlements with Danish names.

  2. Discuss some of the ways in which new technology can influence the forms and ...

    The reason would seem to be that news stories are not concerned necessarily with immediate ease of understanding but with suspense, interesting and holding the reader's attention, titillating and gossiping - being tangential for effect. William Labov's analysis of the structure of personal narratives is helpful in highlighting these differences.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work