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English is not dying but for several reasons it is going through a phase of rapid change, probably more rapid than any it has gone through before.

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Introduction

English is not dying but for several reasons it is going through a phase of rapid change, probably more rapid than any it has gone through before. The English language is always changing, however, at the moment it is going through a phase of rapid change, more so than ever before. This more recent change, I believe, is due to mass media and advances in science and technology global communications (Including SMS messaging, the internet, e-mail and other advances in). Due to being almost flooded with American television adverts and programmes, the English language is taking on board Americanisms, both the pronunciation of words and their spelling. Words such as "colour" in England have been changed in America to "color" and now, with American advertisements, television programmes/films and American written software packages flooding into England, people are slowly adopting the American ways of spelling and speaking. Also abbreviations are catching on and creeping into our language. People are always looking for an easy alternative, and so, instead of typing out how you feel, people are starting to use 'emoticons'. ...read more.

Middle

If new words were not created to compensate for the developments and discoveries, we would be left saying things like "machine for performing calculations", "device for receiving streaming visual and audio", "instrument for transmitting and receiving electromagnetic waves". I believe it is safe to assume we would rather have one word that means what ten words could describe. As well as the introduction of words, emoticons, and the spelling and pronunciation of words changing, their meanings can also change. A "creek" in British English, means 'a tidal inlet of the ocean, or a large river' but American English uses it in the sense of any small stream. Other words have different meanings, depending on the context in which they are used (e.g. "a fine day", "fine silk", "she is fine"). Looking further back at the English language, we can see that it is a mongrel language, comprised and influenced by many other languages. There are some obvious traces of the Celtic influence upon our language, words such as "mug, post, dam, clout" still remain in use today, as well as some place names "Avon", "York", "Thames" and "Leeds" being examples. ...read more.

Conclusion

'Beef' is a derivative from 'le boeuf', which is a French word, as is 'le porc' which is where 'pork' derived from, we also have the word 'pig'. Around this time was the start of the Great Vowel Shift. When William Caxton invented the printing press, gradually there was a standard form of English developing. Before, people were spelling phonetically, and so, different accents had different spellings. This period is known as Early Modern English. Many more words entered the language than at any other period. New words were needed for new concepts and an influx of French and Latin words were the result of this. Other words were brought in from the languages of Africa and Asia due to world exploration. At this time, the Great Vowel Shift was completed and the language began to stabilise. Around the 1700's, the dictionary was introduced. Writers tried to fix spellings and define word meanings. This led to vocabulary and grammar being defined, rules laid down for correct language usage and a model for English dictionary writers. Following this, the development of Rail, colonial expansion, the spread of literacy and education along with printing extended the access to standard and written forms of English. The English Language is always developing, changing and growing, it truly is a living language. ...read more.

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