• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

english literature unit 1 assignment 2

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Spies Assignment 2: The women in Spies are mainly presented through the eyes of the younger Stephan, whose growing maturity means that his views often change throughout the novel. It is important to note that his views may be mixed due to the nature of the main women in the text; Mrs Hayward and Barbara Berrill; they do not portray the typical attitudes of women in the 1940 era. Stephen's particular attention to Mrs Hayward when comparing their families greatness to his own is important, because it shows early on that he notices things about women that he finds particularly remarkable; this is apparent when the older Stephan ponders whether his younger self 'would have perceived the grace and sincerity of Keith's mother quite so clearly if his own hadn't spent most of the day in a faded apron, sighing and anxious?' It is clear that Stephen admires Mrs Hayward for her social appearance amongst the women of the era. ...read more.

Middle

Frayn tries to make this clear by the in depth, positive descriptions of her, even when Stephen protested he didn't like her. 'There's something girlishly self satisfying about the bobliness of the leather and the shininess of the purse that offends me almost as much as her intrusion'. Frayn's theme of domination in the text is well expressed through his presentation of the women in the text. We have Barbara's superiority over Stephan. An example of her intellectual superiority is when she was mocking Stephen, 'you mean you don't know what privet is?' she exerts her physical superiority over Stephen when she effortlessly pushes him over and pins him down to get a look into the basket. Similarly Mrs Hayward, as Barbara did, recognises the mistake made by Keith about the spelling of the sign 'very thoughtful of you chaps to put that label on it', meaning that she believes that the boys merely labelled the hedge. ...read more.

Conclusion

But beneath the surface is a maze of physical abuse and male dominance. As the first signs of domestic abuse within the Hayward house become apparent, the reader is convinced that Mr Hayward is a dominant and unpleasant individual. Stephen notices that on occasions Mrs Hayward is 'made up' more heavily than usual and wears high cravats that cover her neck, probably to cover any visible signs of abuse. In conclusion Frayn portrays the women in the text as superior mentally and intellectually to the males. However it is also important to see them as submissive, it plays a large role within the text. In my opinion this technique used by frayn of having the aspects of the women tells the story, brings the concepts of modern and olden day living together. This creates realism for the reader to develop and create a mental picture of what may have gone on with the women during this time within the story. ?? ?? ?? ?? Jack Lanham Student No: A8-3554-AEL English Literature unit 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Other Authors section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Other Authors essays

  1. How does Frayn present young Stephen in the first three chapters of "Spies"? How ...

    Although this quote clearly shows what the younger Stephen thought, the way it is written makes it sound as if the elder Stephen is being sarcastic when he saying it. I think this is because it is said with such certainty, without any doubt in the phrase whatsoever, and this

  2. How Effectively Does Frayn Use Barbara Berrill in 'Spies'?

    I think that Frayn uses Barbara in this way to really emphasize the detail into which Stephen is discovering himself, both on a conscious and a subconscious level, which is one of the main themes of the book.

  1. Discuss the relationship between Keith and Stephen that is presented in the first Six ...

    to have such an immature approach and worry about all the insignificant things. He also feels regretful for all the 'tolerance, all the intimations of grace and composure' he would rather it have been someone that they could investigate, he feels awkward.

  2. Analyse how Frayn presents relationships between adults and children in Spies

    It is a space where the boy's imaginations can run freely without the authority and interferences of adults. The hideout has its own world controlled by one dominant, authoritarian figure and followed by his subservient companion. Ironically, both Keith and Stephen believe their hideout is impregnable, however their assumptions are

  1. Barbara Berrill

    and later he also says "'Squidgy' is a girl's word that I shouldn't condescend to respond to." This is such a stereotypical and childish view that we again feel slightly superior to Stephen - as we know that this view will change as he gets older.

  2. How do the writers Sylvia Plath and Ken Kesey portray the struggle of the ...

    passive elements of society that submit to authority, such as the government and Nurse Ratched, thus reaching out to the reader and appealing to their sympathetic nature, as most people have, at some point in their lives felt dominated by, or struggled against seemingly authoritative figures.

  1. English Literature Assessment Lucy Honeychurch and Stevens are two characters who represent the ...

    She lacks the self-confidence to make her own judgments about art. In Santa Croce, she longs for her Baedeker guide so that she can know "good art" from bad. The Remains of the Day also introduces a theme of emotional repression in the immediate first chapter through Steven's very proper and fine English language.

  2. english literature unit 1 assignment 1

    things about his childhood. The descriptions of the narrators street is to encourage the reader to experience the things the narrator is seeing, smelling and feeling, the 'warm evening air' and 'well ordered gardens', both of which give a description of something that can be related to.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work