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1984 and Oryx and Crake

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Introduction

1984 and Oryx and Crake Some people say that religion key in building a stable person and society. Discuss the role religion has in the books 1984 and Oryx and Crake. Religion has been the main way in which societies have been formed for thousands of years. Laws, morals and society are basely modelled on it. In both 1984 and Oryx and Crake, the future (or in the case of 1984, the future of the past) is represented as dystopias; a society based on hatred which destroys the human spirit or a society which eventually led to the destruction of itself, leaving only the main character and a small group of new beings. In 1984, Winston Smith is the main character who rebels against society. He believes that human spirit will prevail, shown when he says to O'Brien; "I know you will fail. There is something in the universe - I don't know, some spirit, some principle - that you will never overcome... ...read more.

Middle

He feels that life is meant to be more than what he experiences. Snowman is also given this kind of title; he is the prophet of Oryx and Crake and the Crakers look up to him to tell them about their 'Gods'. At some times he is seen as a biblical figure, such as the first man, with Crake being the person who created the Crakers and Snowman (not Jimmy). Both Winston and Snowman are not very good as role models though, as although Winston is rebelling against what he thinks is wrong, he is only with Julia because she is corrupt, and he gets pleasure from her; "Anything that hinted at corruption always filled him with a wild hope. Who knew, perhaps the Party was rotten under the surface, its cult of strenuousness and self-denial simply a sham concealing iniquity." Winston holds onto this in the hope that perhaps this corruption can somehow break down the party. Snowman too uses the Crakers' belief in him to get things that he wants, such as when he tells them that they must catch him a fish a week, even though they so not like too. ...read more.

Conclusion

Unless he is suffering, how can you be sure that he is obeying your will and not his own? Power is inflicting pain and humiliation." Although extreme, it is this 'religious type' of belief that keeps things stable and keeps the party in power. On the other hand, to say that no religion results in a society that destroys itself is also something like what happens in Oryx and Crake. From what we are told about the society that Jimmy and Crake lived in before, there is no mention that either of them are religious, or there are any other religions mentioned, and the society was destroyed, by people playing 'God' and having power over things that they should not have had. From this, it seems that both the themes of religion and power are in both books, and also in both it is portrayed that they are linked to quite a large extent. Although power is seen as corrupting, there is some power needed to form religion, and society, in order to keep it stable, whether it is for the better or the worse. ...read more.

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