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AS and A Level: Other Criticism & Comparison

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  • Marked by Teachers essays 11
  • Peer Reviewed essays 1
  1. Marked by a teacher

    The English Patient

    5 star(s)

    (Schonmuller, B., 2008:13) The identity of the patient is the mystery around which the novel revolves. "Everyone assumes he is English because of his refined speech and mannerisms." (Ha, K., 2001: 52), but this is just a hypothesis as he is unrecognisable and lacks any identification. Later in the novel and through the patient's fragmented memories, the irony of the book is revealed: the English patient is not, in fact, English. Actually, he is called Alm�sy and is Hungarian by birth, having been in the past a desert explorer and map-maker, part of the National Geographical Society expedition to map the Libyan Desert.

    • Word count: 53965
  2. Marked by a teacher

    Within the three texts, Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh, Look back in Anger by John Osborne and The Whitsun Weddings by Phillip Larkin, each writer explores the concept of a changing world.

    4 star(s)

    This disdain can be seen most clearly in Brideshead Revisited through the character of Lieutenant Hooper. Waugh?s unsympathetic portrayal of Hooper as an ignorant and graceless army officer, lacking the sense of tradition present in the character of Charles, is representative of Waugh?s presentation of the working class in the novel and the changing world where they are becoming more prominent. Waugh?s description of Charles seeing Hooper as a ?symbol? of ?Young England?[2] presents Charles? and also Waugh?s view of a new generation whose pragmatism was at odds with the romanticism and splendour of the upper classes.

    • Word count: 3400

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • Focusing On a Clockwork Orange and Frankenstein compare some of the ways authors explore the idea of what it means to be an outcast.

    "In conclusion, the authors of both A Clockwork Orange - Anthony Burgess - and Frankenstein - Mary Shelley have don e well in concealing the ideas of an outcast in their novels, using the actions of the characters and knowledge of systematic psychological and sociological emotions the ideas of an outcast in the novels were unveiled."

  • Compare and contrast the presentation of the past in The Handmaid's Tale and 1984

    "In conclusion the past in both 1984 and HMT are represented through dreams and flashbacks for both the main characters. This representation is seen constantly throughout the novel and we are reminded that the past holds memories, however minor, for both characters. Both Winston and Offred have lost the past and seem unable to get it back, even though they long for it."

  • Compare and Contrast the presentation on Edmund and Edgar in Sheakespeare's King Lear

    "In conclusion, Shakespeare primarily focuses on creating contrasts between Edgar and Edmund opposed to similarities between the two characters. However one striking similarity does arise. Shakespeare chose to names the brothers Edgar and Edmund; the names are very alike, which is unexpected when their characters differ so greatly. This may be Shakespeare's way of explaining how difficult it is to distinguish between good and evil. The most important contrast he presents is how the two characters represent good or evil. In performance, the colours each of the characters wear reveal the distinct contrast between Edmund and Edgar. This is specifically shown in the battle between the two brothers at the end of the play. Edgar wears white to suggest innocence and goodness and Edmund wears dark colours, which represent evil and sin. The colours symbolise their mental attitudes and personalities. Edmund is presented as a cold malevolent character while Edmund is shown as a trustworthy and loyal who is devastated by losing his family and livelihood. However, it is Edgar who represents morality and is one of the few characters who survives the play, in consequence, presenting the legendary moral that good will always defeat evil. Approx"

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