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A comparison of “Nineteen-Eighty Four” and “The Time Machine,” with particular focus on the authorial purpose and how it is achieved.

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Introduction

" A comparison of "Nineteen-Eighty Four" and "The Time Machine," with particular focus on the authorial purpose and how it is achieved. " "The pen is mightier than the sword;" an expression that summarises the central theme of both my choices for the wider reading assignment. George Orwell (Eric Arthur Blair) and Herbert George Wells both apply an ingenious and extremely effective technique in their finest novels, "Nineteen Eighty-Four" and "The Time Machine." Their tool is not blindingly obvious, but rather like a Trojan horse, implanting itself in the readers mind whilst he or she is indulging in the storyline. Their tool, a concealed propaganda in a way, is the use of satire. Satire is the use of ridicule, irony, humour or other such methods to mock any given subject. Satire is widely recognised as a deadly weapon in media, and is a genre for moving picture and written text. I class "Nineteen Eighty-Four" and "The Time Machine" as political satires as they confront certain political ideologies. The latter also falls under science fiction as it plots a scientist's adventures as he travels into the distant future in his time machine. In fact, "Nineteen Eighty-Four" is also set in a future time (relative to the time of writing), but it does not involve any time travelling or regard other such scientific theme. Both serve as prophecies of what society may come to if current political practices are continued. I feel that this is very obvious in both books. In "The Time Machine," the main character actually proclaims after telling his story, "No. ...read more.

Middle

Orwell then demonstrates that these people have no choice. Winston and his lover Julia, whom he discovered was also rebellious at mind, are found out whilst attempting to assimilate with the proles. They are taken to the Ministry of Love, where, to the reader's horror, their way of thinking is altered so that they conform to the party and learn to truly love Big Brother. A world where the government has so much power, that it can control people's thoughts and wishes, may seem bizarre to present day readers, but it was not so to the Britain of 1949. At the time, totalitarian tyrannies were in the recent past or in current practice, i.e. the Nazis and The Soviet Union under Stalin. Britain was still recovering from the devastation that the war with the Nazis had brought and people were still very traumatic and sensitive with the subject. Orwell would not have to think twice about whether this novel would might received as an exaggeration. The Time Machine is written from a first person point-of-view. This allows the story to be more dramatic, as the character's feelings and thoughts can be shared with the reader. It also makes it easier for the reader to imagine the situation, as they can imagine themselves in the place of the main character. "Nineteen Eighty-Four" is written from a third person point-of-view, but orients around Wilson. Often, Orwell goes into the mind of Winston and writes in the first person. This allows Orwell to express Winston's thoughts, but also write about certain aspects without bias. Both novels use vivid descriptions of horrific situations as their element of satire. ...read more.

Conclusion

Orwell was only writing thirty-five - or so - years into the future, and so modifications cannot be as extreme. Due to their hidden messages, both books seem to be targeting readers who would be capable of decoding the front-text. The Time Machine also discusses scientific and philosophic matters, which would be difficult to comprehend if the reader is not familiar with that area of science. Nineteen Eighty-Four also requires the reader to be psychologically mature, as it includes some pages that portray sex. The major difference between the two books is the political philosophies that they are criticising. "Nineteen Eighty-Four" suggests that Orwell disapproves of communism - especially Stalin and his reign of terror - and, obviously, totalitarianism. The general message in the book is that theoretical communism is not possible, and real communism always involves a tyrant. "In The Time Machine," Wells is targeting capitalism. The Time Traveller states, "...social difference between the capitalist and the labourer was the key to the whole position." He believed that over time, industrial workers were banished to the underground and evolved to work here. I think that both books were an excellent read. The authors effectively included powerful messages in an engrossing storyline. The use of satire gave the texts their power. "Nineteen Eighty-Four" is amongst my favourite books, not only because Orwell, being the master satirist that he is, cleverly ridicules Stalin and communism in general, but also because Orwell has a unique style of communicating with the reader. His texts are informal and interesting, allowing him to form tight relationships with the reader. ?? ?? ?? ?? "Nineteen Eighty-Four" vs. "The Time Machine" Anish Kothari - 11R 1 Summer 2002 ...read more.

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