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Compare and contrast the ways Ibsen presents Nora in A Dolls House with the ways Bront presents Jane in Jane Eyre.

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Introduction

Compare and contrast the ways Ibsen presents Nora in "A Doll's House" with the ways Bront� presents Jane in "Jane Eyre". How far do you agree with the view that both women are victims of the men they marry? Both Nora in "A Doll's House" and Jane Eyre in "Jane Eyre" could be described as allegories of women and their plight in contemporary Victorian times. Both personas struggle against the restrictions of women during this time and strive to find their own identities. However, despite society's pressure on both women, it could be argued that Nora is more of a victim of her husband than Jane, as Jane has had time to 'discover' herself throughout the novel, yet when "A Doll's House" ends Nora has only just set out on her 'journey of self-discovery'. To describe Nora as a victim of the man she married wouldn't wholly be untrue. Due to the treatment she received at the hands of her husband and father our first impressions of her are, that she behaves like an immature child, due to her speech and behaviour. On Nora's first entrance she is shown to be quite immature as she acts very child-like. ...read more.

Middle

Despite this, we are given the impression that Nora is content with her life as she starts 'humming' to herself when, she realises her husband is home. This adds to the perfect wife image Ibsen tries to convey as we see this happy young wife who "simply wanted to make [her family] happy". However, with the way Nora is able to manipulate men so easily because of her beauty and taking into account how she was able to acquire a loan for Torvald in secret, we are also presented with the idea that Nora isn't so simple. Therefore, the image of Nora as a victim is accurate because Nora is portraying the part that society expects of her. In reality this role is just a facade covering the instability and lies that are barely holding this family together. Ibsen uses the Christmas tree as a metaphor for Nora's marriage. A Christmas tree is traditionally a symbol of hope, associated with a family festival of joy. It's first presented as ornamented with "candles" and "flowers" covering up its true appearance so it looks prettier, just as Nora's relationship has been covered by a veneer of deceit and pretence. ...read more.

Conclusion

She is therefore victimised in that she must pretend to be someone and something she is not and in the end we see how this pretence destroys/ed her marriage. Frustration felt by Nora feels in various moments throughout the play are examples of how Nora is trying to break out of the boundaries and restrictions that Victorian society has placed on contemporary women of the time. When Nora tells Rank and Mrs Linde of her "extraordinary longing to say: 'Bloody hell!'". This sort of behaviour would have been unheard of in Victorian society and so we can see how Nora tries to express herself without constantly worrying about whether what she says is appropriate- to be herself. Ibsen is showing us that despite the fact that Nora tries so hard to please her husband and all those around her this will never be enough for her to feel truly fulfilled. Her lack of freedom also contributes to her feelings of frustration. Nora's apparent lack of a sense of self from time spent pleasing others with no time to do things that she herself wants, to adds to this. Nora is a woman who knows her place in society; she knows how to make her husband happy as she reacts in just the right way, showing her 'admiration' for Torvald as she "claps her hands". ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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