• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Comparing The Foresyte Saga & Othello

Extracts from this document...


Both extracts explore the theme of adultery and extreme examples of conflict in a relationship. However, the differing time periods in which they are set and the contrasting ways in which the authors portray them, vary accordingly. In both extracts it appears that the female protagonists seem to be the source of the problem within the relationship and the extracts centre on their supposed adulterous behaviour. The two extracts differ because in Shakespeare's Othello, the audience know that Desdemona has in fact not cheated on her husband, but his possessive nature and mistrust of her has warped his judgement. In Galsworthy's novel, it is clear that the character of Irene clearly has been unfaithful through the description of her body language and the dialogue used, "so you've come back." The men in both extracts have the controlling factor within their relationships, and suffer from possessive love. In Othello, his desire to control Desdemona and to have her all to himself because she's his wife, clouds his judgement on the situation; he'd rather her dead than for her to be with any other man and break another's heart. ...read more.


Thou dost stone my heart." Neither Soames nor Othello can see the fault in their own actions, demonstrated by Galsworthy through rhetorical questions: "Why should I suffer? What have I done?" Irene, however, is left in a helpless place, the animalistic imagery continuing, likening her to a trapped bird, her spirit crushed and giving up, "a bird shot and dying, taking farewell of all that is good - the sun and air and its mate." This comparison also links back to Irene's now dead lover Bosinney, her partner, without whom she feels she is unable to function. Shakespeare uses stichomythia to create a passionate atmosphere. Short dramatic lines such as 'it is too late', build tension in the audience. John Galsworthy also uses speech to create tension but does so via the exposure of Soames' thoughts. 'Take away that pitiful white face'. Soames' outburst is made particularly striking in the way that Galsworthy withholds excessive speech up until this point. Unlike Shakespeare who employs continuous dialogue and only one stage direction in this extract, to create a sense of a never ending flow of emotion. ...read more.


miss, or exceed the mark', this shows his dark side and makes the reader question whether he killed her himself without knowing what she had done, similar to the way Othello acts on rage of his pride being damaged. The Duke also seems to be very possessive of the Duchess as is Othello and Soames Forsyte. Here he opens the poem 'That's my last Duchess painted on the wall' immediately highlighting he owns the painting, but also implies he owns her in person. He also seems to like the fact he can control who looks at the painting, 'the curtain I have drawn for you', but couldn't control who looked at his wife when she was alive. Additionally, in comparison to the imperatives Shakespeare and John Galsworthy use, Browning stresses the Duke's power through his quite forceful request, 'will't please you sit and look at her', almost as if the Duke is desperate for his audience to understand his anger, he states 'I gave commands', yet it seems she didn't obey him, hence he killed her, 'then all smiles stopped together'. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Othello section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Othello essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    The English Patient

    5 star(s)

    The patient has used the desert to lose himself, to shed his nationality and identity. As a setting for a love story, the desert is an empty and barren place, which helps us focus on the intensity of personal connections that take place there.

  2. Analyse the ways in which Shakespeare uses dramatic conventions in his plays and why ...

    This again shows that everything has its price. They speak a bit more and Beatrice hidden in a bush cannot believe what she is hearing. In the BBC Shakespeare remake of this play when Beatrice is eavesdropping she is in a toilet cubicle, the effect of this is to show

  1. ‘The Love Song Of J. Alfred. Prufrock’ by T.S Eliot and ‘My Last ...

    Prufrock may then find a new life through the woman or she could misunderstand him for another one-night stand; `That is not what I meant at all,' and the whole awful nightmare starts over again. The mood of the poem varies throughout.

  2. Ambition in "The Duchess of Malfi" and "Paradise Lost"

    "So spake the apostate angel, vaunting aloud but racked with deep despair" suggests Satan has become maddened by his actions caused by his ambition to overthrow God. "Vaunting aloud but racked with deep despair" emphasises Satan's furiousness of his punishment, and is seen unforgiving of God for his eternal suffering.

  1. 'Follower' by Seamus Heaney, 'Last Lesson of the Afternoon' By D.H. Lawrence and 'My ...

    There is a complete tonal shift and a complete role reversal. The writer now has a sense of irritation as it is no longer that follows but his father who follows him. The tables have turned as Heaney has become a man, and his father is now older and out of his prime.

  2. Comparing the Role of Women in Sense and Sensibility and Othello

    To you I am bound for life and education. My life and education both do learn me, How to respect you. You are the lord of duty. I am hitherto your daughter. But here's my husband. And so much duty as my mother showed. To you, preferring you before her father, So much I challenge that I may profess, Due to the Moor my lord."(I.III.82-191).

  1. Compare and contrast how the destructive nature of love is presented in Shakespeares Othello, ...

    Othello makes his intentions clear we he promises to 'tear her all to pieces', although Othello doesn't show how destructive he is physically, the language that Shakespeare uses shows the reader that Othello is aggressive.

  2. "How do the authors portray love in their texts?" Macbeth By William Shakespeare, ...

    She even mentions the different types of work she has to do herself and make them sound hard working. We get to know this when she says: ?And then I must scrub and bake and sweep? Over her, the repetition of ?and? make her work sound lengthy and hard working.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work