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Comparison Of Our Scripted Work On 'The Crucible' by Arthur Miller and 'The Merchant Of Venice' by William Shakespeare

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Introduction

Comparison Of Our Scripted Work On 'The Crucible' by Arthur Miller and 'The Merchant Of Venice' by William Shakespeare My practical work in March was a scripted piece for which we took three scenes from 'The Crucible' by Arthur Miller. My contribution to the performance was playing two characters - Mercy Lewis and Mrs Putnam. I took part in all three of the scenes we chose to perform which included two scenes from act one and a section of the court scene in act three. To help me in my work I went to see a production of 'The Crucible' in Stratford as well as watching the film. ...read more.

Middle

Although the language is still old fashioned it is still understandable as it isn't too different to how we speak now. The biggest similarity which connects the two plays is that they both feature a court scene. However, these court scenes are quite different from each other. Although there is quite a heated argument in 'The Merchant of Venice', it remains relatively calm compared to the court scene in 'The Crucible' which becomes so disorderly that it actually becomes quite funny. It is a lot louder and more frantic than in 'The Merchant of Venice' and has a completely different atmosphere. Arthur Miller creates quite an eerie feel in the court scene when the girls start to repeat everything Mary says and also builds up a lot of anger later of when Proctor is talking to Danforth. ...read more.

Conclusion

We made a great effort to ensure that our characters all had suitable costumes which I think added to the performance and helped me to feel in character. It also helped the audience to keep track of which character was being played by who, as there were a quite a lot of changes of actors throughout the play. As well as helping with the characters I think that by having costumes we managed to capture the right time and culture. Whilst working on the play we also experimented with accents but decided against using them in the performance as it just adds unnecessary complications. Overall I learnt a lot from both plays as they were very different to anything I had previously worked on. I found it interesting and enjoyable to work in a completely different culture and time period. ...read more.

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