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AS and A Level: Other Play Writes

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  • Marked by Teachers essays 2
  1. Marked by a teacher

    The History Boys. Consider the significance of finding your way in life, in relation to the characters in the play.

    3 star(s)

    Bennett went to Oxford University and also fell in love with a classmate. The character who epitomizes Bennett the most is Posner. The boys in this novel are all trying to find their way in life and getting into Oxbridge goes a long way towards achieving that. The primary aim for all the boys of the class is to get into Oxbridge. It is more important to them than other students knowing the fact that they?re from a working-class background.

    • Word count: 2658
  2. Marked by a teacher

    Re-read Act 2 Scene 6 of Murmuring Judges. Discuss Hares presentation of the position of women in the police force and the legal profession in this extract and the play as a whole.

    3 star(s)

    Also, no other characters enter the scene as it progresses, so the conversation between Sandra and Irina, and the issues appertaining secrecy and injustice which it raises, are more well-received by the audience, who focus their attention totally on the speech and aesthetic expressions of the two women, and their meanings. For instance, towards the end of the scene, there grows "a real warmth suddenly between the two women," building upon the aforementioned smile share between them, emphasising their rapport and so the matriarchal nature of their culture.

    • Word count: 1082

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • With detailed reference to at least three of the monologues, discuss how the narrators may be considered 'artless' in Alan Bennett's terms.

    "In conclusion, all, but one, of Alan Bennett's monologues are considered to star artless narrators. Although some of the monologues are less artless than other, for example, Graham in 'A Chip in the Sugar' is far more artless than Susan in 'Bed Among the Lentils' but both are considered to have artless qualities."

  • Explore the ways R.C. Sherriff presents the attitudes of key characters in 'Journey's End'. Compare and contrast your findings with the ways the attitudes of key characters are presented by Peter Whelan in 'The Accrington Pals'

    "In conclusion, the attitudes of characters in Journey's End and The Accrington Pals are largely similar. However, because of the massively different situations that the plays' characters are confined to, they're forced to think differently about certain aspects of things. Journey's End's characters try their hardest to be completely devoid of emotion, because they have to be, whilst The Accrington Pals's predominantly female characters are much quicker to allow their own feelings to get dragged into things. These two mindsets, that of the numbed soldier and that of the emotionally charged female townie, inevitably have an effect on the characters' attitudes. However, amongst the men of the two plays, even though there's definitely a natural divide between the attitudes of the upper class and the lower class, as we have seen through our comparisons between the two plays, it's clear that, as officers become more experienced in war, their attitudes begin to become increasingly similar to those of their men - Raleigh even chooses to sleep and eat with his men rather than be with his fellow officers at one point, which shows how war can change one's initial attitude to class; it unites people of different backgrounds and beliefs in order to combat what most believed was a common enemy."

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