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Explain how you think Act 3 affects the audience(TM)s feelings about Othello.

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Introduction

Explain how you think Act 3 affects the audience's feelings about Othello. You might consider: * Whether you see him as a victim of Iago or not * His change from loving to loathing * Your response to his language * His plans for Desdemona and Cassio Act III is a highly significant scene among all of those in the play of Othello. Act III moves the play along and heightens the intensity, drama and tension between the characters. The plot of the play pans out as the act provides the audience with a skeleton of the time frame in the play; and hence a great sense of urgency. In my own opinion, I feel that the later two scenes (scene three and four) are the most capable of tracking the audience's feelings about Othello. Scene three is one of the longest scenes, consisting of 480 lines and entrances and exits. Shakespeare has to keep up the relentless pace to remove opportunity for questions to creep into Othello's mind. Othello can be seen as a victim of Iago in this scene, and evidently it is widely referred to as the 'temptation' scene. The scenes previous to this are almost engulfed with conversation in which Iago manipulates Othello and aggravates him by speaking of something which only Iago knows. Othello's short fuse almost reaches it's end in scene three as he is driven to madness with curiosity; he exclaims "I pr'ythee, speak to me as to thy thinkings". ...read more.

Middle

As their feelings will differ depending on who they feel is to blame for this. Many believe that Iago is entirely to blame for such a quick and decided shift in Othello's emotions, and some believe that Iago plays but a small role. In 1904 a critic known as A.C.Bradley quoted "His (Iago's) thwarted sense of superiority wants satisfaction and He is the spirit of denial of all romantic values". Thus contributing to the belief that Iago's manipulation and twisted influence deeply warps our tragic hero's romantic thoughts and feelings. Iago holds such an undeniably strong presence in Othello's life. He is the antagonist and leaves Othello confused and with no reason not to believe him. There is a great deal of evidence in the play to suggest that the noble protagonist is pushed towards emotional turmoil and contorted thoughts by ruthless Iago. Iago quotes "that cuckold lives in bliss" and "if it be hers (the handkerchief that he claims that Cassio had) or any that was hers; It speaks against her with the other proofs." However it is plausible that an audience might be reduced to disliking Othello due to his change from love to loathing. It is possible that Othello is entirely to blame for his deteriorating state of mind and his new-found inclination for hatred. In 1930, G.Wilson Knight supported this opinion, by quoting "Othello is infatuated by emotion, for its own sake, he luxuriates in it" . ...read more.

Conclusion

He calculates like a real assassin, "Within these three days let me hear thee say That Cassio'd not alive" and he decidedly quotes "I will withdraw to furnish me with some swift means of death for the fair devil". This is a turning point for the audience's every respect and high esteem of Othello. In conclusion, I feel that Act III would have left the audience with a new depiction of Othello. Throughout this Act Othello is no longer the noble, courageous and decent man that we know him as. He presents a more cowardly man, who is easily manipulated by Iago and is easily reduced to very low levels. Othello is definitely less likeable following Act III as he becomes accustomed to derogatory language, he is consumed by jealousy and revenge; and thus he is transformed from a benign and compassionate soldier and husband to a rancorous, erratic assassin. Consequently by the end of Act III, Othello would have conformed to the stereo-type Moor of the time; proving the Elizabethan audience correct in their probable initial impressions of the black soldier. Nonetheless, there is however the possibility that Act three would have left Shakespeare's audience feeling ever so slightly sympathetic towards the protagonist. Since, an Elizabethan audience would have understood the weight Othello attaches to his reputation, pride and therefore anger at Desdemona. In Shakespeare's day a man's honour was extremely important and his wife's chastity was an integral part of it. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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