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How Important Is Prince Henry (Prince Hal) in Henry IV-Part 1?

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Introduction

How Important Is Prince Henry (Prince Hal) in Henry IV-Part 1? In the play Henry IV part 1, we see that Prince Henry (Prince Hal) plays an important part in the whole plot. We see that he is the focal point of the plays main themes. Prince Hal spent almost all of his time in the tavern with Sir John Falstaff, his best friend. In act 2 scene 4, Prince Hal has an interesting conversation with Falstaff. At first, the conversation begins with a little light-hearted humour when Sir John plays the King interviewing the Prince and Prince Hal plays as himself. Falstaff, playing the King, starts the conversation by saying, "Peace, good pint-pot, peace" to me as a reader this seemed quite funny in the sense that a 'King of England' would address his son, the prince a pint-pot. Falstaff then said, while still playing the King, "I do not only marvel where thou spendest thy time, but also how thou art accompanied." He later went on to say, "And yet there is a virtuous man whom I have often noted in thy company, but I know not his name." Really all this time Falstaff was asking Prince Hal about himself. ...read more.

Middle

His father replied, "God pardon thee!" The most important part of Prince Hal's reformation was when he decided to ride into battle alongside his father Henry IV. Hotspur (Harry Percy) had led a rebellion and wanted to overthrow Henry IV so his son Prince Hal promised that he himself would fight Hotspur to the end. Before the battle had begun Vernon, Hotspurs cousin came to Hotspur and described how great Prince Hal looked. He said, "All furnish'd, all in arms; all plum'd like estridges that with the wind bated, like eagles having lately bath'd; Glittering in golden coats like images; As full of spirit as the month of May, And gorgeous as the sun at midsummer." Hotspur could not take this anymore and was just lost for words when he heard his own cousin, a rebel fighter saying such brilliant words about someone he was just about to fight. The final battle between Prince Hal and Hotspur was the grand finale of the completion of Prince Hal's reformation. Hotspur however mocks Prince Hal a little and boasts about himself as well. Hotspur does this by saying, "Harry, for the hour is come to end the one of us; and would to God thy name in arms were now as great as mine!" ...read more.

Conclusion

He described Prince Hal to Hotspur so magnificently that Hotspur even told him to stop talking because he could not hear Prince Hal's praises anymore. Hal was described by Vernon, "All furnish'd, all in arms; all plum'd like estridges that with the wind bated, like eagles having lately bath'd; Glittering in golden coats like images; As full of spirit as the month of May, And gorgeous as the sun at midsummer. Wanton as youthful goats, wild as young bulls, I saw young Harry with his beaver on, his cushes on his thighs, gallantly arm'd, rise from the ground like feather'd Mercury, and vaulted with such ease into his seat as if an angel dropp'd down from the clouds to turn and wind a fiery Pegasus, and witch the world with noble horsemanship." As this came from a rebel fighter, this emphasised the fact that the impact that Prince Hal had on everybody was astounding. My conclusion is that Prince Henry (Hal) plays an important role in the play because he manages to have an affect on everyone and everyone seems to be effected by him. Prince Hal is also the next heir to the throne in succession of his father Henry IV so he therefore is an important person and he has to uphold certain responsibilities and cannot let people like Falstaff sway him in the wrong direction. ...read more.

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