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Compare and contrast the content and style of "To His Coy Mistress" and "The Unequal Fetters".

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Introduction

Compare and contrast the content and style of "To His Coy Mistress" and "The Unequal Fetters". 'To His Coy Mistress' by Andrew Marvell and 'The Unequal Fetters', by Anne Finch both share the theme of love. The poems differ in many ways; they both have very different meanings. 'The Unequal Fetters' was written from the point of view of a woman whereas 'To His Coy Mistress' was by the point of view of a man. They were written in different time periods 'The Unequal Fetters' was written in the mid to late seventeenth century early eighteenth, and 'To His Coy Mistress' was written in the mid seventeenth century. 'The Unequal Fetters' concentrates on the tie of women in marriage, and 'To His Coy Mistress' relates to seductive love. 'To His Coy Mistress' is a poem addressed to a young woman from a young man lover. First of all the poem explores how to seduce his lover through extreme exaggerations. Marvell then goes on with slightly more seriousness and considers the idea that a drawn out courtship may possibly be overtaken by death, and perhaps happiness and joy being wiped out forever. Finally the poet concluded that their relationship is so strong and if they fulfil his passion they can defeat the passage of time. Andrew Marvell uses vivid images all to make the argument more convincing. In the first Stanza he uses romantic persuasion to try to woo his beloved by explaining that if they had all the time in the world he would wait for her, for instance ' we could sit down, and think which way to walk and pass our long love's day.' ...read more.

Middle

The last stanza of To His Coy Mistress, starts with the words "now therefore" suggesting an alternative to the horror of the last nightmarish images. Marvell here tries to conclude his thoughts and offer an alternative to the previous ideas. He asks her to sleep with him before time runs out and compares himself to "strength" and her to "sweetness." His tone varies in this stanza from flattery and fear. He feels that now is the time to do it while they an item and young he says "And now, like amorous birds of prey," this means he wants to eat her up greedily like love birds. He doesn't see the point in having the power and not using it. He wants to use the passion and energy. He refers to "iron gates" which gives the image of being locked out meaning that once you are dead there is no going back. "To His Coy Mistress" is written in enjambment; this is when the end of the line is not punctuated but flows into the next examples of this are lines 3, 5, 6,7,21 etc. He uses enjambments because it helps to sub stain the argument because it is continuous. He also uses rhyming couplets for the pace and rhythm, this is done for built momentum- it builds the drive of the argument. He also uses definite rhyming couplets effectively to convey his inner feelings: "My vegetable love should grow it Vaster that empires and more slow". ...read more.

Conclusion

The third verse makes it clear about her feelings of the inequality and shows her anger towards men by writing, "Free as Nature's first intention was to make us, I'll be found, Nor by subtle Man's invention Yield to be in fetters bound". This means that when a female is born she is born free but then because of men fooling you into there sincere love and into marriage, women are trapped by men. The final verse of "The Unequal Fetters" she concludes that "Marriage does but slightly tie men Whilst close prisoners we remain". She means that women are chained by marriage while men are free and can stretch "At the full length of all their chain." "The Unequal Fetters" refers to the unequal lengths of chain men and women have. Her poem shows how wrongly men treat women just as in "To His Coy Mistress". Anne Finch writes her poem in a frank manner whereas Andrew Marvell writes in a sick, perverted and threatening manner. The writer of "To His Coy Mistress" seems to be quite a selfish writer on the other hand the writer of "The Unequal Fetters" writes an honest version of her own true feelings. "The Unequal Fetters" is written in caesura with every other line rhyming which contrasts to "To His Coy Mistress" which is written in enjambment. Even though "The Unequal Fetters" is quite a short poem it has a very powerful message. Both poems have their differences along with their similarities which makes them a perfect comparison, each with their own views. By Alana Holmes 10/6 ...read more.

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