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AS and A Level: Modern

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  • Marked by Teachers essays 20
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  1. Marked by a teacher
  2. Marked by a teacher

    HOW DOES FITZGERALD TELL THE STORY IN CHAPTER 1 OF THE GREAT GATSBY?

    5 star(s)
    • Word count: 2855
    • Submitted: 17/12/2010
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Lucy Foss 29/05/2013
  3. Marked by a teacher

    Walker's presentation of Celie and Shug's growing relationship.

    5 star(s)
    • Word count: 1518
    • Submitted: 12/03/2004
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Katie Dixon 29/04/2012
  4. Marked by a teacher

    Why is symbolism in the Catcher in the Rye so important?

    4 star(s)
    • Word count: 1095
    • Submitted: 03/06/2005
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Karen Reader 11/05/2012
    • Reviewed by: (?) _becca 02/04/2012
  5. Marked by a teacher
  6. Marked by a teacher

    Explore Walkers Portrayal of Female Identity - The Color Purple

    4 star(s)
    • Word count: 1558
    • Submitted: 26/04/2010
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Katie Dixon 26/12/2012
  7. Marked by a teacher

    How Does Atwood present women in the Handmaid's Tale?

    4 star(s)
    • Word count: 1563
    • Submitted: 01/12/2009
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Jeff Taylor 23/07/2013
  8. Marked by a teacher

    To what extent and in what ways is Fitzgerald purely critical of Gatsby's dreams?

    4 star(s)
    • Word count: 1705
    • Submitted: 09/06/2009
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Roz Shipway 07/12/2012
  9. Marked by a teacher
  10. Marked by a teacher

    Compare how a sense of claustrophobia is built up in the Handmaids Tale and an Evil Cradling

    4 star(s)
    • Word count: 1488
    • Submitted: 16/04/2008
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Katie Dixon 16/07/2013

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • Discuss the significance of seemingly “unrealistic” or apparently implausible characters, places or events in literature you have studied.

    "In conclusion, the seemingly unrealistic or implausible characters in the context of each novel do play a crucial role in the development of the ideas the author wants to portray. In the first case, the Savage acts as the ambassador of our proper human passions in the Brave New World so that Huxley's point of view on the conflict presented, the trading of freedom and high art for ignorant bliss, is conveyed properly, using the necessary narrative subjective ness. However small carelessness's in the plot create an involuntary implausibility in this character making it not at all convincing in the underlying levels, yet no less effective in the conceptual clash and further debate, which is the whole point of the novel. In Captain Corelli's Mandolin a much different technique is employed by De Berni�res as we have observed, making of Alekos equally effective in transmitting the authors ideas as John, but doing so in a more artful and thought up way than Huxley through a subtle symbolic representation of the human values behind the author's call to innocence and modesty as the ultimate form of wisdom."

  • What key phenomena must theories of colour perception account for? Describe and evaluate how theories try to explain the phenomena.

    "In conclusion, a combination of the Opponent and Trichromatic theories would best explain the key phenomenon of colour, as although there is an overlap in that they can both account for colour mixing, other phenomena are exclusively explained by one of other of these theories . E.g. colour deficiency and after-images are neatly accounted for by the Opponent Theory, but not by and the Trichromatic Theory. The author suggests that dichromatic deficiencies might additional be explained in terms of regional problems in the eye, as red/green confusion only occurs in the peripheral regions (Hurvich, 1981). The closest explanation for colour constancy was provided by the Retinex theory, however, neither this or the other two theories, provided a clear explanation for this phenomenon. The author therefore suggests that further investigation is needed, proposing that there may be a three-stage model, where the cone receptors send signals to the opponent cells, which in turn are categorised into different visual systems."

  • Discuss Burgess’s language in the opening chapter: how does he depict the world of Alex and his friends as being in conflict with the “outside”? (10 marks)

    "Another aspect of society that is not missing, but seems unpopular, is that of literature. Alex reports that "newspapers {are not} read much" - whether this is because of illiteracy or just lack of interest, one is unsure. The Public Biblio, which is the derelict-sounding municipal library, was something that "not many lewdies used those days". Again, the reason why is not clear. Owing to the other "past-times" of the day, namely ultra-violent criminal activities, it is likely that nobody is interested in literature any more. This certainly fits in with the way in which Alex and his friends persecute a man just because they saw him coming out of the library with books in his hand. However, there are"

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