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AS and A Level: Alice Walker

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  • Marked by Teachers essays 4
  1. Many would argue that men hold the power in "The Colour Purple". Explore the opinions of critics Andrea Stuart and Mary O' Connor and explain your own view of what Alice Walker has to say about the power in "The Colour Purple".

    The love shared between Shug and Celie was getting closer and more passionate. Shug's feelings for Celie to us seemed true even though she had male sexual partners Celie still seemed more important to Shug than any other of her male partners. Andrea Stuart expresses that Celie doesn't mind that her lover Shug comes home with a husband. She only cares that Shug is back with her, "the existence of a husband is irrelevant to what is important, the relationship between the two women". Albert did not have a clue to what was going on between the two of them.

    • Word count: 3588
  2. Examine the author's presentation of men, women and gender roles in 'The Color Purple' and 'Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit.'

    Instantly the readers are drawn into the brutality, violence and inhumanity of this particular 'male' gender. The father addressed as 'Pa,' who is supposed to represent a protector, comforter, breadwinner and guardian- that loves and protects his family, is presented in a completely diverse manner. Whereas in "Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit," the protagonist touches upon the fact that the father is the breadwinner in the house, however is incapable of emotionally providing for the young Jeanette, as he is never there for her.

    • Word count: 3733
  3. Alice Walker's novel "The Third Life of Grange Copeland" - review

    Margaret has become a woman resigned to her life and tries to emulate Grange's life of drinking and copulation. Grange Copeland eventually leaves the family to go 'up north' to seek his fortune. When he leaves, Margaret kills herself and her baby, leaving Brownfield to cope alone. Brownfield leaves the poverty stricken area and goes in search of his father, but stops at a whorehouse owned and run by 'Fat Josie' and her daughter. While he is there, he meets 'Mem', the niece of Fat Josie and eventually they decide to marry.

    • Word count: 3389
  4. This report is based on comparing six different documents.

    3.0 Findings I found by looking at each prospectus there were similar elements between them and also that they were similar to one another. I saw all that all prospectuses have had information on courses. I noticed that all the application forms were laid out the same they all used boxes all application forms use boxes because it makes the forms look better. 3.1 Prospectus Spelthorne collage The first document I collected was a prospectus from Spelthorne collage I got the prospectus by ordering it on-line from www.spelthorne.ac.uk but it can also be picked up from Spelthorne collage in Ashford.

    • Word count: 4493
  5. What are the main themes of Pleasantville and how does the director convey them to the audience using cinematic techniques?

    One of the main themes of the movie is liberation. The town of Pleasantville, prior to the entry of Bud and Mary-Sue, is very regulatory, and leaves nothing to the imagination. In short, the town is dull and this is reflected by its lack of colour - the town is completely black and white. However, after Bud and Mary-Sue have began to awaken many of the citizens of the town such as Betty, Mr. Johnson and Skip, the town becomes much more lively, and there is a definite change - the town is now in colour.

    • Word count: 5430

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • What key phenomena must theories of colour perception account for? Describe and evaluate how theories try to explain the phenomena.

    "In conclusion, a combination of the Opponent and Trichromatic theories would best explain the key phenomenon of colour, as although there is an overlap in that they can both account for colour mixing, other phenomena are exclusively explained by one of other of these theories . E.g. colour deficiency and after-images are neatly accounted for by the Opponent Theory, but not by and the Trichromatic Theory. The author suggests that dichromatic deficiencies might additional be explained in terms of regional problems in the eye, as red/green confusion only occurs in the peripheral regions (Hurvich, 1981). The closest explanation for colour constancy was provided by the Retinex theory, however, neither this or the other two theories, provided a clear explanation for this phenomenon. The author therefore suggests that further investigation is needed, proposing that there may be a three-stage model, where the cone receptors send signals to the opponent cells, which in turn are categorised into different visual systems."

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