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Write with Detailed Reference to at Least Three Stories and Show how Jane Gardam Reveals the Extraordinariness of Ordinary People.

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Introduction

Write with Detailed Reference to at Least Three Stories and Show how Jane Gardam Reveals the Extraordinariness of Ordinary People. Jane Gardam uses a variety of writing styles to give the characters and narrators a sense of extraordinariness. She does this, for example, through her choice of language that gives life to the characters. Three stories in this collection that show this are The First Adam, Stone Trees and An Unknown Child. One of the ways in which Jane Gardam explores the unusual features of every day people is the use of narrative voice, in first or third person. The First Adam, is a story of a man named Bull. After finding retirement boring, Bull returned to work in Drab. The analogy of the orang-outang is a symbol of Bull's lonely life, which also comes across through the use of monologue throughout the story. The audience are first introduced to Bull's extraordinary way of life when he uses the phrase "My tender mistress" to describe his work. This story is written using a first person narrator and so he expresses his own thoughts and feelings to the reader. This is useful for the reader as they are seeing exactly the same as Bull and so gain an understanding of the way he views Drab, his work and his life. ...read more.

Middle

This illustrates the extraordinariness of Bull, as he seems to have a very interesting perspective of work a sees it very differently to other people. This encourages the reader to believe that he has a stronger relationship with his work that his wife. This, again is shown by Bull calling his work his "mistress". Lastly, in Stone Trees, there is a symbol of the solidarity of stone in comparison to the life of a tree. This shows the characters' attitudes and impressions of their lives and surroundings in comparison to each other. For example, where as the narrator wants to freeze her love for her husband and does not feel that she can share her love with other people, similar to the stone petrifying tree, her husband has touched other peoples lives which is evident from his child who is like him in looks but also in personality. The narrator's response to the child is important as it is the first time she feels close to a person other than her husband illustrated by the last line "so now that you are" which indicates that she feels close to her husband through the boy. In all three stories, Jane Gardam gives the impression of the characters being mainstream, unremarkable and average. ...read more.

Conclusion

One of the most obvious of these occurs in An Unknown Child where Evelyn's moment of self-realisation occurs and she sees that she, "never thought of him." This illustrates a surprising fact about Evelyn to herself and to the audience that the family turning up late for dinner acted like a catalyst for them realising what they have lost. The main twist in The First Adam, however, is not so obvious. I, personally think that Bull's day of "no work" is the twist in this story as even though he was still bored in Drab, he is still in control of his life. In Stone Trees, the narrator is amazed at how kindly Peter is treating her, "even though he is only seven". This evokes a moment of realisation when she sees the pink starfish and sees the, "growing things that are there all the time, though only now and then seen." All these characters experience "The Pangs of Love" which shows them to be different and in some cases extraordinary. Jane Gardam's use of writing styles, for example first and third person, monologue, stream of consciousness and use of metaphors of motifs teach the audience different features of the characters so that they are seen as individuals. The fact that the characters thoughts are all told to the reader helps them to empathise with the characters and see them as surprising for coping with their difficult situations in the ways that they do. ...read more.

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