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"Every text offers a unique perspective" Discuss with reference to your set text and other texts.

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Introduction

"Every text offers a unique perspective" Discuss with reference to your set text and other texts Within all texts a unique perspective is offered to the responder. A re-occurring idea within many texts is that of perspectives on change and truth. All of the texts studied offer to the responder a unique perspective on the idea of change; these vary greatly upon the composer's ideas, beliefs and opinions. All of the texts challenge the idea of a 'universal' truth. They demonstrate that truth is a perspective, which changes based upon the responders cultural values, and personal beliefs. This is shown mainly in Kenneth Branagh's Much Ado About Nothing, Jennifer Saunders's Absolutely Fabulous (Episode: Death), the cartoon A Woman needs the patriarchy like a fish needs a bicycle, The Board of Studies "Changing" booklet, Texts 2a and 2b, and in John Keats' sonnet On First Looking Into Chapman's Homer. Branagh's 20th century appropriation of Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing, deals with change in a light-hearted, humorous, way. Through the text the director is suggesting that large changes in perspective can be brought about by very small events. ...read more.

Middle

This music creates not only a romantic atmosphere, but is comically timed with close up shots of the characters reactions, to help show this surreal idea of changing perspective. The scene ends with a montage of images of Beatrice and Benedick from a crane shot of the garden setting. The music builds up from that of a flute and violin to that of an entire orchestral arrangement at the end to heighten the joy and happiness of the characters, which plays during the montage that contains comical images of Beatrice upon a garden swing, and Benedick dancing in the fountain. Much Ado About Nothing takes the idea that a small event, can change your perspective in a huge way. This directly contrasts with Jennifer Saunders' Absolutely Fabulous (Episode: Death), an early 1990s British comedy Television series, deals with change in a humorous fashion. Within this text the director takes the idea that a huge event, such as the death of a parent, can have no effect whatsoever on the protagonist Edina. The director deliberately looks at this change in perspective from a comical and ironic perspective to cause a reaction from the responder. ...read more.

Conclusion

The tone is one of seriousness; the responder expects a change in perspective. Edina is then joined by Saffron and she speaks to her in a serious tone about death, the audience is led to believe that Edina has had a major change in perspective, until she beings to shout, "I don't want to die, I've invested so much into this body and this lifestyle". This once again shows Edina's self-centred attitude toward her life, and the fact that this event has caused no change within her whatsoever. Both these texts show that there is no one definitive 'Truth' on how a change in perspective alters people. It is based upon the ideas, beliefs and opinions of the composers. This is shown through the basic ideas of changing perspective within the texts. Both suggest that a change in perspective is possible, but that it takes a different point of view on the event to change your perspective. This idea of challenging a universal truth is also shown in the Board Of Studies "Changing" booklet Texts 2a and 2b, as is the ideas of change. These texts suggest that for a change in perspective, there must first be a change in society. ...read more.

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