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examine how Wilfred Owen responded to the jingoistic poetry of Jessie Pope.

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Introduction

" Who's for the game? The biggest that's played" The above quotation is from Jessie Pope's "who's for the game." With reference to "Dulce et Decorum Est" and "Anthem for Doomed Youth" by Wilfred Owen, examine how Wilfred Owen responded to the jingoistic poetry of Jessie Pope. Wilfred Owen was born in Shropshire on the 18th of March 1893. Owen volunteered for the army in 1914 when the First World War broke out. After training he became an officer and was sent to France at the end of 1916. The following year, Owen took part in the attacks on the German Hindenburg line, where he was suffering from shell shock after a shell burst near him. The horrors of battle quickly transformed Owen and the way he thought about life. The reasons behind Wilfred Owen's poems were to indoctrinate the people of those times. "Dulce et Decorum Est" was to enable Owen to show the true meanings of war and to over right the untruthful poem of Jessie Pope and her propaganda technics. Jessie Pope's poem " Who's For The Game?" There are sporting references such as "Who'll toe the line," "Who'll grip and tackle the job unafraid." ...read more.

Middle

Gas!" This illustrates another side of warfare, the confusion and panic when the soldiers lives are in danger. The pace of this verse is much quicker in order to demonstrate the true horrifying panic the soldiers were experiencing. The second stanza fourth line " And flound'ring like a man in fire or lime," sums up the groping desperate movements of the men as they become enveloped in this deadly gas. The word drowning in this area of the poem depicts the struggle for air. " In all my dreams, before my helpless sight, he plunges at me, guttering choking, drowning," these lines are important, it is a personal insight into the mind of the narrator who is telling the story. The words " I saw him drowning," gives a true feeling of reality, it helps to emphasis the true images Wilfred Owen witnessed. The simile used "like a devil's sick of sin" describes the horrifying expression on the man's face. The word "gargling," is linked to the use of the word "flound'ring," onomatopoeic of the desperate fight for air the soldier was holding. The last five lines of the fourth stanza describe negative, disgusting images of war, which is totally opposite to the incidents Jessie Pope, writes about her poem. ...read more.

Conclusion

The response is "not in the hands of boys but in their eyes," implying that as opposed to a candle that would be lit at a traditional funeral to symbolise everlasting life, these soldiers received tears in the eyes of boys. "The pallor of girls' brows shall be their pall," compares the elaborate cloth that would cover the coffin in a Victorian style funeral. The final comparison is that of dusk, to the drawing down of blinds in a house in mourning. "And each slow dusk a drawing down of blinds," creating the image that dusk is like a blind that is being lowered. The funeral is over and rhetorical question that Owen asked at the beginning of the first stanza has been answered and the noise has vanished. All is now quiet. The long, heav 'd' sounds really drag the ending on and draw the poem to a deliberate close. In conclusion, I feel that both poets are effective, but they both present such different pictures of war. Owen's poems are excellent examples of poetry portraying the realism of war, whereas Pope's poem is an excellent example of the unfortunate attitude cultivated on the home front. The contrast between the two allows the reader to see the reality of the First World War from two immensely different perspectives. Wendy Cartlidge ...read more.

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