• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Explain how the mechanicals bring humour into the play

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Explain how the mechanicals bring humour into the play The mechanicals in A Midsummer Night's Dream are the group of actors that bring most of the comedy to the play. This is done by the mechanicals resembling the more unintelligent group out of the four featured in A Midsummer Night's Dream. In the book, the mechanicals are called the Clowns. This implies that they are always fooling around; never getting any work done and maybe making people laugh. Maybe Shakespeare called them the Clowns because they convey most of the humour towards the audience in A Midsummer Night's Dream. However, the mechanicals play near the end of A Midsummer Night's Dream is a serious play; where they do not mess around as they do in the rest of the book. This might suggest that the name Shakespeare gave to the actors (Clowns) does not imply all that it is supposed to. ...read more.

Middle

and he forgets lines. In the end, he just plays Pyramus. The way the mechanicals bring humour into A Midsummer Night's Dream is mainly through Nick Bottom. Bottom is the fool in the play; always getting things wrong. Bottom comes across as a little dumb; maybe eccentric. He gets his words wrong, comes up with feeble ideas, and has a spell put on him by Puck. The spell transforms Bottom's head into an ass's head. I think it would convey more humour to A Midsummer Night's Dream by having Bottom transform into an ass entirely. Near the end of A Midsummer Night's Dream, in act 5 scene 1, the mechanicals act out their play. Many things bring humour into A Midsummer Night's Dream at this point. Peter Quince tells the audience that the lion is not a lion, but Snug the joiner. The audience would know that the lion is not a real lion, as it is just common sense. ...read more.

Conclusion

For instance, when the mechanicals are talking casually together, they speak in verse; when acting out their play in front of the duke, they speak in prose. Some of the misunderstandings of the mechanicals are when Puck puts the spell on Bottom. Quince says 'O monstrous! O strange! We are haunted! Pray, masters, fly, masters! Help!' This shows that they are unsure of what to think of Bottom, and Bottom is oblivious to the fact that he has an asses head on him. Instead Bottom starts singing (to show that he id not afraid of what they are saying to him). This in turn wakes Titania up, who has had the love juice put on her eyes. As she wakes up, she instantly falls in love with Bottom. This is reminiscent of the fact that of A Midsummer Night's Dream's main mood it creates is that of humour and that it is mainly the mechanicals that are involved in, or create the humour. (813 words) ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level A Midsummer Night's Dream section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level A Midsummer Night's Dream essays

  1. Why is Bottom such a well-loved character? Explain with reference to 'A Midsummer Nights ...

    Theseus decides to give Hermia till the day of his wedding four nights away, for her to decide whether to marry demetrius or live her live alone till death. The second of the tree world that we come into contact with in the play is that of the mechanicals.

  2. To what extent is the mechanicals' performance of Pyramus’s and Thisby a success?

    Thisby's speech is another example of mixed up words - "These lily lips This cherry nose These yellow cowslip cheeks ...His eyes were green as leeks" Thisby's speech is funny because if you imagined someone looking like she has described then they would look really funny.

  1. How Language is used to convey comedy in the play of "Pyramus and Thisbe" ...

    The Wedding Guests Theseus and Hippolyta are the hosts for the wedding. This is one of the couples who got married; the celebrations are for them to commemorate their wedding day. This reception is only to fill in the time before bed as explained in Act 5 Scene 1.

  2. A Midsummer Night's Dream - How do events in the play support Lysander's claim ...

    speaks in rhyming couplets, emphasising the happy mood they are in and the changed atmosphere. 'I swear to thee by Cupid's strongest bow, By his best arrow with the golden head, By the simplicity of Venus' doves, By that which knitteth souls and prospers loves,' As well as the rhyming

  1. Explore the Ways In Which Shakespeare Presents the Rude Mechanicals.

    I will roar, that I will do any man's heart good to hear me." This also shows that he has a high opinion of himself and thinks himself better than the others. This is not realistic though as you can see when the play is performed the Bottom overacts and is laughed at by Theseus.

  2. What difficulties have you experienced in producing a modern version of the play and ...

    Helena and Demetrius enter the wood. Helena tells Demetrius how she feels, but he doesn't feel the same way. She is determined to win over his heart, and whatever Demetrius says and does, despite the nature of it, Helena falls more deeply in love with him.

  1. How would you direct the scenes depicting love between Titania and bottom to show ...

    to discover that she has fallen madly in love with him. The social status of Bottom is as it sounds, 'Bottom', he is a weaver who works for a living, like now, back in the 1590's, there were three classes.

  2. The final word on the imagination belongs to Theseus

    Ordinarily a love triangle like that of Hermia, Lysander, and Demetrius would cause a great deal of trouble just for the sake of love, but it is further complicated by Egeus' insistence that Hermia marry Demetrius, despite her love for Lysander.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work