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Explore how the theme of marriage is presented in 'Pride and Prejudice' and 'The Yellow Wallpaper'.

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Introduction

´╗┐Sophie Hunter11SONovember 13th Explore how the theme of marriage appears in ?The Yellow Wallpaper? and ?Pride and Prejudice? The theme of marriage is predominant in both Jane Austen?s ?Pride and Prejudice?, as the main aim or goal of most of the characters, and Charlotte Perkin?s ?The Yellow Wallpaper?, where we get an insight to how a 19th century marriage functions after the wedding. Both novels are centred around the middle or aristocracy so this will have a huge impact on the characters expectations of marriage and what they believe a marriage?s purpose is. ...read more.

Middle

Nevertheless, Gillman?s ?The Yellow Wallpaper? could be viewed as extreme and dramatic. Either way, both texts have approached the theme with both similarities and differences. Unlike Jane?s marriage to Bingly, Elizabeth?s marriage is very unusual for a woman of her class as she is not marrying Darcy for his fortune. A middle class woman, such as herself would be responsible for raising the social status of her family, this is seen in Mrs Bennet?s wish top get her daughters well married off, ?Jane?s marrying so greatly must throw them in the way of other rich men?. ...read more.

Conclusion

Her begging to her husband to organise a visit shows how important it is to her, possibly because she feels it is her duty. For the middle classes, marriage is the only way to ?move up? and mothers such as Mrs Bennet grasp this chance with both hands, love in a marriage is a luxuary. This attitude upolds the opening text: ?It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife?. This statement forms the judgement that "happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance? ...read more.

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