• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Explore the different ways in which "The Send Off" and "Joining The Colours" reveal each poets feelings about soldiers leaving for war. The poems "The Send Off and "Joining the Colours" are both quite similar, they

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Explore the different ways in which "The Send Off" and "Joining The Colours" reveal each poets feelings about soldiers leaving for war. The poems "The Send Off and "Joining the Colours" are both quite similar, they are both about soldiers leaving for the war, however in "The Send Off" the men are returning to the front, we know this as the men seem to know their fate, they have gone to war before, they know what it is really like and they know that they are going off to die: "And lined the train with faces grimly gay", this is an oxymoron it is like the soldiers are faking happy and trying to get through this even though this sentence reminds you of death, another indication that these men know their fate is: "A few, a few, too few for drums and yells" the soldiers know that hardly any of them will be returning , and if they do then there will be no one there to welcome them back and no celebrations: "May creep back, silent to village wells, up half-known roads" it is like everyone has forgotten them and everything has moved on, even the roads have changed. ...read more.

Middle

However in "Joining the Colours" we know that the men are quite young, "smooth cheeked and golden, "Foolish and young, the gay and golden boys" and "the mothers sons" these are all quite effective as these boys don't know that they will die and we get the image that they are so young and innocent. In The Send Off" it is all very secret and they try not to let anyone see that the soldiers are returning to the front line, "Down the close darkening lanes" whereas in "Joining the Colours" they make no secret of the fact that they are going off to war, "They they go marching all in step so gay!" and "On the high tram tops, singing like the lark" it is like the soldiers want everyone to know that they are going off to war, to fight for their country, but in "The Send Off" they don't want anyone to know because they are older and more experienced they know that going off to war is not something to shout to the world about. ...read more.

Conclusion

Hinkson writes like she is looking on at these boys, like a mother saying goodbye to her son, however Owen writes like he is one of the soldiers, he deals with the soldiers feelings and how it really is to go off to war, but Hinkson deals with the emotional side. Both of the poems have a lot of imagery and personification, in 'The Send Off' Owen uses inanimate objects around the train station to personify the conspiracy "then unmoved, signals nodded, and a lamp winked to the guard" even the signals are in the secret. In "Joining The Colours" it is the street that is personified, "the drab street stares to see them row on row" however this is to show that the soldiers came from a poor area. Just as death is shown in "joining The Colours", it is also shown in Owen's poem, "And lined the train with faces grimly gay" this is also an oxymoron, in "Joining The Colours" we see a contrast, "They pipe their way to glory and the grave" this is also alliteration which makes it slightly bitter in tone. ?? ?? ?? ?? Natalie Crouchley 11a ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level War Poetry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level War Poetry essays

  1. Comparing two poems - The poems Joining the Colours and The Send-off both discuss, ...

    The tone of The Send-off written by Wilfred Owen is slightly sardonic and ironic due to the author's experiences. Ironic, in the sense that the Tramp watching at the station is more fortunate than they are, he's saying that someone with one even with the life of a tramp is

  2. The Going of the Battery and Joining the Colours

    Within the poem, an unusual and interesting image takes shape using the structure and language as tools. Within the content, the conflict is between the men and the women, however this appears elsewhere in the poem. The rhythm is very important and influential in this poem.

  1. The poems Joining the Colours and The Send-off both discuss, young, guileless boys marching ...

    as if the soldiers going off to war and even more so returning home were an embarrassment. "A lamp winked at the guard" Even the personification of a lamp emphasises the secrecy of the action. And the reader also feels that the lamp and guard are laughing at the stupidity and utter ignorance of the soldiers.

  2. How do E A Mackintosh and Katherine Tynan Hinkson describe 'going off to war' ...

    Mackintosh starts off with a sarcastic tone, e.g. "How the message ought to read" (L.12). Slowly, the poem becomes straightforward and inspirational, saying "Go and help to swell the names/In the casualty lists." (L.17-18) Language effects can also be seen.

  1. A Comparison of how the poets in 'Joining the Colours' and 'the Send Off' ...

    "Dull porters and a casual tramp," Owen describes the people as "staring hard" as if they have pity for the men however feeling glad they are not fighting.

  2. From the pre-1914 selection, choose two poems that show different attitudes towards war and ...

    The Charge of the Light Brigade is written in a style that reminds us of an epic. The poem has a fast pace and rhythm, which would be to help build the positive, uplifting mood amongst the soldiers. This is due to the fact that they are riding on horseback, and there would be the drum of the horses' hooves.

  1. In 'Of the Great White War' and 'Base Details,' the poets write about age ...

    Also, the statement of becoming old to defend shows Burke believes that it is the job of the old to be protective, or at least not exclusively the job of the young. Using 'marched away' shows that the young were packed up and sent on their way without a choice in the matter.

  2. Compare the ways Owen and Tynan present the departure of the soldiers for World ...

    On a more subtle level, she is also condemning pre world war one society for producing clones who are all 'in step'. Owen uses the alliterated phrase 'siding shed' in the second line of 'The Send-off' to suggest the secretive sidelined nature of the men's departure.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work